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Department of Health Newsroom 2008


December 4, 2008: County Health Department Renews Local WIC Program
December 2, 2008: Saint Louis County Health Department Urges Residents to Attend Community Health and Wellness Fair at Normandy High School
November 20, 2008: Saint Louis County Sees Significant Increase in Number of Pertussis Cases
November 19, 2008: Saint Louis County Department of Health Honors Student Artwork with its Annual Tobacco Prevention Calendar
October 27, 2008: Saint Louis County Sees First Flu Cases of the 2008-2009 Flu Season
October 24, 2008: HIV Testing Going Well at Normandy Senior High School
October 15, 2008: County Department of Health to Offer HIV Testing for Normandy Senior High School Students
October 13, 2008: County Residents Can “Go Green” With Proper Disposal of Household Chemicals
October 9, 2008: Health Department Urges Residents to Get a Flu Vaccine
September 17, 2008: County Health Department Cautions Public about Bats
August 28, 2008: First Human West Nile Virus Case Reported in County
July 28, 2008: County Health Department Working with Pool Operators to Meet New Federal Safety Standards
June 27, 2008: Local Mosquitoes Test Positive for West Nile Virus
June 12, 2008: Salmonella News
May 12, 2008: Health Department Offers Information About Bats
May 1, 2008: County Health Department Urges People to Remember the Uninsured during National Cover the Uninsured Week
Apr 29, 2008: County Health Department to Consolidate Two Health Center Clinics
Apr 23, 2008: County Residents Can “Go Green” With Proper Disposal of Household Chemicals
Apr 14, 2008: County Health Department to Have More Convenient Hours at the Office of Vital Records
Apr 10, 2008: County Health Department Recognizes Rockwood School District for Its Extraordinary Recycling Efforts
Apr 07, 2008: County Health Department Urges Recycling During National Public Health Week
Mar 25, 2008: County Health Department Offers Free Tetanus Shots; Other Assistance to Those in Flood Areas
Mar 21, 2008: County Health Department to Provide Free Well Water Testing for Residents in Flood-Stricken Areas
Feb 06, 2008: County Health Department Distributes Recycling Carts
Jan 30, 2008: County Health Department Tracks Jump in Flu Cases
Jan 10, 2008: County Volunteer Medical Reserve Corps Awarded Grant


County Health Department Renews Local WIC Program


The Saint Louis County Department of Health has signed a contract with the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services to continue local WIC services through federal fiscal year 2009.


“WIC” is shorthand for the federally-sponsored “Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children”. The program serves nearly half of all infants born in the United States as well as their mothers. Under the terms of the new contract, Saint Louis County will be able to serve up to 8,531 WIC-eligible people every month.


The WIC program provides nutritious supplemental foods and individualized nutrition education and counseling for at-risk pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and children up to five (5) years of age. Last year in Saint Louis County, the WIC program issued checks for 101,849 packages of food.


WIC also makes critical referrals as needed to other health care and public assistance programs. In addition, it provides breast feeding education and sponsors support groups open to residents of Saint Louis County.


Eligibility for WIC services is based on income, family size, and nutritional risk. A family of three (3) would qualify if their annual earnings were $32,560 or less, whereas a family of eight (8) could earn up to $65,860 annually and still qualify. Pregnant women are counted as two family members.


Currently, there are four (4) WIC sites in Saint Louis County. For additional information about the WIC program, please call the Saint Louis County Department of Health at (314) 679-7900.



Saint Louis County Health Department Urges Residents to Attend Community Health and Wellness Fair at Normandy High School


On Saturday, December 6th, from 9:00 a.m. to noon, the Saint Louis County Department of Health will be participating in a Community Health and Wellness Fair sponsored by the Normandy School District being held in Viking Hall on the Normandy High School Campus. The Health Department urges all residents in the area to attend the event which will serve as a great public service for all in the community.


“Too often, we as a society focus on treating health problems after they have developed rather than trying to prevent them from occurring in the first place,” said Dr. Dolores J. Gunn, director of the County Health Department. “I applaud this effort by the Normandy School District to encourage healthier people, healthier living, and healthier communities through education and prevention, and I encourage everyone in the area to stop by the event this Saturday.”


Those who attend will have the opportunity to receive free health screenings for cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and obesity. Informational and educational literature will also be available covering a wide variety of topics including healthy eating and nutrition, fitness and exercise, early illness detection, proper dental care, as well as many other healthy living issues.


In addition to the screenings and literature, there will be entertainment at the fair in the form of attendance prizes, performances, contests, drawings, an aerobics class, and demonstrations. It will be a fun time for all who attend and the Saint Louis County Department of Health encourages everyone in the area to keep Saturday morning free for this wonderful event.


Normandy High School is located at 6701 Saint Charles Rock Road.



Saint Louis County Sees Significant Increase in Number of Pertussis Cases


As of yesterday, the Saint Louis County Department of Health has received 146 case reports of pertussis in 2008 compared to just eight (8) cases for the same period last year. Many of these cases are occurring among school-age children (14 years of age and younger).


“The recent numbers are a concern for the Health Department because this is an illness that can largely be prevented by appropriate vaccination,” said Dr. Dolores J. Gunn, director of the Health Department.


Pertussis, commonly known as “whooping cough”, is caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis. It is highly contagious and can easily be spread from person to person through coughing and sneezing. An individual is most contagious just before the onset of symptoms and, unless treated, continues to be contagious for up to three (3) weeks after symptoms start; however, treatment with appropriate antibiotics can shorten this period of contagiousness.


Primary symptoms usually appear five (5) to ten (10) days after exposure, but can take as long as 21 days to develop. Symptoms during this early stage of the illness are similar to those of a common cold and can include a runny nose, sneezing, a low-grade fever, and a mild, occasional cough. Gradually, the cough may become more severe and, after one (1) to two (2) weeks, an individual may start having spasmodic bursts of numerous, rapid coughs. A high-pitched “whoop” may occur at the end of the coughing spell(s). After such an attack, an individual may also vomit.


The Saint Louis County Department of Health would like parents, school staff, the medical community, and the general public to work together with the department to combat the outbreak in the following ways:


  • Maintain the highest possible level of immunization in the community by ensuring that all children and adolescents receive the appropriate pertussis vaccination.
  • Keep infants (particularly those who are not fully immunized) away from people with a cough. Ask your doctor to promptly evaluate infants with any coughing illness.
  • Stay home from work or school when you are sick. School health staff should also be particularly vigilant to ensure that sick children are not permitted in school.
  • Practice proper respiratory etiquette by always covering your cough or sneeze. Wash your hands frequently.

Physicians are urged to be aware of the significant increase of pertussis in the community and to treat infected individuals and people who are close contacts of infected individuals with the appropriate antibiotics. If a physician is considering a diagnosis of pertussis, the physician should test for and treat the infection, as well as advise the patient to remain at home. Physicians should also report cases to the local Health Department so that measures to prevent the spread of the disease can be rapidly undertaken.


For more information on pertussis, please visit the Saint Louis County Department of Health website at www.stlouisco.com/doh/cdc/cdsnews.html .



Saint Louis County Department of Health Honors Student Artwork with its Annual Tobacco Prevention Calendar


Tomorrow – Thursday, November 20th – is the Great American Smokeout and the Saint Louis County Department of Health is using the opportunity to remind people about the serious health risks posed by all forms of tobacco use. The Health Department is also using the day to highlight its 2009 Tobacco Prevention Calendar featuring artwork submitted by students throughout Saint Louis County.


“One of the most important things we need to teach our children is how dangerous tobacco is,” said Dr. Dolores J. Gunn, director of the Health Department. “The annual calendar contest is a fun way to impart that vital message to our kids.”


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (the CDC), tobacco use is currently the greatest threat to public health and remains the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Approximately one (1) of every five (5) deaths each year is due to a tobacco-related illness (about 438,000 deaths each year).


Every day in Missouri, over 9,900 youth become smokers. In addition, over 350,000 Missouri children are exposed to secondhand smoke daily. If current trends continue, 140,000 Missouri children are projected to die prematurely from tobacco-related diseases.


As part of the Department of Health’s efforts to educate the youth of Saint Louis County about the dangers of tobacco, its Health Education Department sponsors the annual calendar artwork contest for students in both the public and private schools of Saint Louis County from kindergarten through 12th grade. Students are asked to create anti-tobacco posters for the calendar which is then sent out to all participating schools. This year, more than 3,000 area students submitted artwork with themes such as “Be Smart, Don’t Start” and “Don’t Be A Fool, Smoking’s Not Cool.”


Tobacco is not just dangerous for those who smoke. More than 126 million non-smoking Americans, including children, are regularly exposed to secondhand smoke. Even brief exposure can be dangerous because nonsmokers inhale the same carcinogens and toxins as smokers. Secondhand smoke exposure can cause serious disease and even death, including heart disease and lung cancer, sudden infant death syndrome, acute respiratory infections, ear problems, and more frequent and severe asthma attacks.


Public health officials believe that health messages from peers may have more influence on young people than the same messages received from other sources. The annual poster contest encourages Saint Louis County youth to spread the message about the dangers of tobacco among their peers.


A panel of judges from the Saint Louis County Department of Health selected thirteen winning posters to be used in the 2009 Calendar which was distributed to participating schools earlier this year. The thirteen students whose posters were selected were each awarded a $25.00 mall gift card.

All the winning submissions can be found on the Saint Louis County Department of Health’s website www.stlouisco.com/doh/education/tobaccocalendar2009.html.

Additional state and national statistics can be found at: http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/.

Information about the Great American Smokeout can be found at: http://www.acsf2f.com/gaso/.



Saint Louis County Sees First Flu Cases of the 2008-2009 Flu Season


The Saint Louis County Department of Health has learned that the first confirmed cases of influenza (flu) have been diagnosed in two south county residents. Both residents are in their thirties. These first two cases come a month earlier than last year, and health officials say it’s a reminder for people to get vaccinated.


“The flu has arrived in Saint Louis County a little earlier this year. That shows why it’s so important to get vaccinated. Remember, if you don’t catch the flu, you can’t spread the flu,” said Dr. Dolores J. Gunn, director of the Saint Louis County Department of Health.


Confirmed flu cases represent only a small percentage of the total number of cases in the community. However, they are a useful indicator of both when the flu season has arrived and which age groups are most affected.


There are other steps you can take to reduce your chances of getting the flu:


  • Try to keep a distance of three feet away from others.
  • Always cover your mouth when you sneeze or cough. If you don’t have a tissue, sneeze or cough into your sleeve.
  • Wash your hands frequently, especially after sneezing, coughing or blowing your nose.
  • Stay home if you are ill.

To find out where to go for vaccinations (or to find more information about the flu), please call the Flu Vaccination Hotline or visit the Saint Louis County Flu website:


314-644-4FLU (644-4358)


www.SaintLouisCountyFlu.com



 HIV Testing Going Well at Normandy Senior High School


Earlier this week, the Saint Louis County Department of Health began offering free and confidential HIV testing to students at Normandy Senior High School. The decision to offer the testing was made after the department learned through a routine disease investigation that some students at the high school may have been exposed to HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. As of now, the testing is proceeding smoothly and the Department of Health would like to thank the Normandy School District, the students of Normandy Senior High School, and the parents of students for their help, their cooperation, and their professionalism regarding the testing process.


The Health Department would like to reiterate that as of this time, there remains only one HIV-positive case identified by the investigation. At this time there is no new information to report; however, this is an ongoing investigation and whenever new information is gathered that can be publically released, the Health Department will make that information available.


The department has also been working with the Normandy School District to implement the collaborative response to the situation that has included not only the free, confidential testing for students, but an aggressive educational campaign for the students, parents, and staff of the school. Information has been handed out to students and sent home to parents, and two informational meetings were held to address any questions or concerns students or parents might have. There has also been a hotline set up for students and parents to call if they have any additional questions or concerns.


The most common methods of HIV transmission are sexual activity and the sharing of needles, either while injecting drugs or while receiving a body piercing or tattoo. The Department of Health believes that accurate information is the key to protecting the students and general public, and to minimizing the likelihood of a similar situation occurring in the future.


For reasons of confidentiality, the Health Department will not disclose the method or methods of potential HIV transmission being investigated in the Normandy situation. However, in order to dispel false information that has been heard in the community, the Health Department would like to make it clear that no information it has obtained during the course of the investigation indicates that tattoos, the receiving of tattoos, or any particular tattoo business has played any role in this case of potential HIV transmission.


The Department of Health would also like to request again that the media and public respect the privacy of the students at Normandy and their families. It is also requested that no action be taken that would interfere with the teaching and learning process at any of the Normandy school campuses.


Note: Existing law prohibits the Department of Health from releasing any personal or medical information about anyone who is or who may be involved in this situation.



County Department of Health to Offer HIV Testing for Normandy Senior High School Students


The Saint Louis County Department of Health recently contacted the Normandy School District about a potential health concern involving students in that district. Information obtained by the Health Department during a routine disease investigation indicated that some students who attend Normandy Senior High School may have been exposed to HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.


The Department of Health has discussed the matter with the Normandy School District. Both the department and the district are in the process of implementing a collaborative response to minimize the impact on the students attending school there. The department will be providing assistance to the Normandy School District to help them ensure that students at the school have access to free, confidential HIV testing. The school district has been communicating with the parents of their students and encouraging them to have open and forthright discussions with their children about the urgency of this situation. In the event families determine that their children may have engaged in any unsafe sexual behavior, both the Department of Health and the Normandy School District are advising that those students be tested.


In response to the situation, the Normandy School District is conducting an aggressive informational campaign to make certain that all of their students and the families of those students gain a heightened awareness of the HIV threat and its potential impact in the community. Accurate information is the key to protecting students and minimizing the likelihood of a similar situation occurring in the future.


These developments are certainly a concern for the students who may be affected as well as for their families, and both the Department of Health and the Normandy School District request that the media and the public respect the privacy of the students and their families at this time. It is also requested that the media and the public not take any action that would interfere with the teaching and learning process at any of the Normandy school campuses.


Note: Existing law prohibits the Department of Health from releasing any personal or medical information about anyone who is or who may be involved in this situation.



County Residents Can “Go Green” With Proper Disposal of Household Chemicals
Saint Louis County Department of Health sponsors free events for residents to drop off unwanted household chemicals


As Saint Louis County residents clean up from a summer of fun, they often rediscover those stored household chemical materials they had long-intended for disposal. For the eleventh year, the Saint Louis County Department of Health is offering an environmentally safe alternative for disposal of these chemicals through its fall household chemical collection events.


Drop-off events will be held on three Saturdays:  October 25th, November 8th, and November 15th.  All events run from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., rain or shine.  The events are free of charge and are open to all Saint Louis County residents.


“Many of the residents calling our office are unsure about what to do with their leftover chemicals. By bringing their unwanted materials to these events, residents can be assured the materials will be disposed of safely and pose no potential harm to themselves, their families or the environment,” said Dr. Dolores J. Gunn, Director of the Saint Louis County Department of Health.  


Gunn said that this program has been very popular with residents and that she hopes to see even more participation this year. The county also spent a great deal of effort this past spring to develop a new curbside recycling program that has already significantly increased residential recycling.


“Residents have found that it is so easy to recycle now. Recyclables can be tossed together into a recycling cart (no sorting required) and then just rolled to the curb,” Gunn said.


The handling of chemical products, however, requires special disposal and recycling methods, and residents should continue to save these items for the chemical collection events, Gunn added.  While recycling is a good option for handling these hazardous materials, the Department of Health emphasizes the importance of practicing source reduction. 


“We recommend that residents avoid having excess materials in the first place,” said Laura Yates, Waste Management Specialist.  “Consumers should buy only what they need or use products up entirely.”


The cost for the household chemical events is covered by the Saint Louis County landfill surcharge fund.  Proof of residency, such as a driver’s license or tax bill, will be required.  For more information on these events, please call the Department of Health at 314-615-4130 or visit their Web site at www.RecycleSaintLouis.com.


All events are from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. – Rain or shine!
 
Saturday, Oct. 25 South County Center
    (formerly Westfield Shoppingtown – South County)
    South of the Dillard’s and Sears stores
    (Enter from Lemay Ferry Road, south of South Lindbergh Blvd.)
Saturday, Nov. 8  St. Louis Community College – Florissant Valley Campus
   

(On Pershall Road just east of the I-270 and Elizabeth Avenue exit)


Saturday, Nov. 15  Westminster Christian Academy – Town and Country Campus
   

800 Maryville Centre Drive


   

(Just south of Highway 40 off the Maryville Centre Drive exit)


 
For maps and directions, visit www.RecycleSaintLouis.com.

ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS: Paints, stains, varnishes, pesticides, herbicides, poisons, gasoline and other fuels, solvents and strippers, aerosols, motor oil and filters, gas cylinders (BBQ-pit size or smaller), fluorescent tubes, rechargeable batteries, anti-freeze, brake and transmission fluids, pool chemicals and other acids and bases, car batteries, wood preservatives, driveway sealant, and items containing mercury (such as thermometers, thermostats, and mercuric salts).

UNACCEPTABLE MATERIALS: Explosives and ammunition, radioactive waste, smoke detectors, medical waste, household trash, tires and other bulky items.

Materials from business, commercial, non-profit and government organizations are also prohibited.



Health Department Urges Residents to Get a Flu Vaccine


Flu season has arrived and the Saint Louis County Health Department is urging that all residents be vaccinated against the flu – especially those most vulnerable such as the elderly and young children.


Yesterday, County Executive Charlie A. Dooley and Dr. Dolores J. Gunn, Director of the Saint Louis County Department of Health, were both vaccinated against the flu at an event highlighting the importance and ease of being vaccinated.


“It not just about protecting yourself. If you don’t catch the flu, then you can’t spread the flu,” said Dr. Gunn.


To find out where to go for vaccinations (or to find more information about the flu), call the Flu Vaccination Hotline or visit the Saint Louis County Flu website:


314-644-4FLU (4358)


www.SaintLouisCountyFlu.com


Flu season runs from October through April every year. Depending on the severity of the outbreak, between 15 and 60 million Americans are infected each flu season. Over 200,000 people are hospitalized every year due to flu-related complications, and around 36,000 of them die. The populations most vulnerable to the flu are the elderly and young children.


Other standard precautions being urged by the County Health Department are:


  • Wash your hands frequently.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue.
  • Limit your contact with infected people.
  • Stay home when you are sick.


County Health Department Cautions Public about Bats


The Saint Louis County Department of Health cautions residents to be careful around bats.  Bats are the most common source of rabies infection in humans – a disease that is invariably fatal if left untreated.


Residents should avoid handling the animals, and if a bat – alive or dead – is discovered in their home, they should immediately contact Saint Louis County Animal Control.  Residents should not attempt to capture a live bat, but should confine it to the room where it was discovered until an Animal Control Officer can safely collect it for rabies testing.


 “Most bats do not carry rabies, but enough of them do to warrant testing the ones that come into contact with humans,” said Dr. Dolores J. Gunn, director of the Health Department.  “Never release a bat when a human may have been exposed.  Rabies vaccine is in short supply, so it is imperative that every bat be tested.  If a bat tests negative, we are then able to save the scarce rabies vaccine for use elsewhere.”

During business hours, residents who live north of Page Avenue should call 831-6500. Residents, who live south of Page Avenue, should call 726-6655. After business hours, and on weekends and holidays, county residents should call Saint Louis County Police at 889-2341.  Residents can also visit www.stlouisco/com/doh and click on Animal Control.


Last year, 439 bats were tested and eight (8) were found to have rabies.  So far this year, 365 bats have been tested and 15 have tested positive for rabies.  Because of the danger of rabies transmission, any exposure to a bat should be reported and evaluated.  Never release or discard a bat found inside living quarters – especially if it was present while people were sleeping or in the same room with children or adults who, due to their health or age, may not be able to describe the extent of their exposure.

Health officials urge people to be cautious around all wildlife in Saint Louis County and to avoid direct contact with any animal that is behaving strangely. Children should also be taught to stay a safe distance away from any unknown animals.

Residents are also urged to check on the immunization status of their pets. Because rabies can be readily passed from wild animals to pets, the first line of defense is to make sure all cats and dogs are properly vaccinated, as required by county ordinance.  Information on pet vaccinations can be found at www.stlouisco.com/doh.



First Human West Nile Virus Case Reported in County
Public Health officials in St. Louis County report that a 52-year-old Normandy area man has been diagnosed with West Nile virus. The man was treated at a local hospital last week. This is the first human case of the virus in St. Louis County this year. The county had 14 reported cases in 2007. County Health Director Dr. Dolores J. Gunn said the disease infects birds and is spread through mosquitoes. Dr. Gunn said avoiding mosquito bites is the best way to prevent exposure, and offered the following reminders:


  • Get rid of all standing water.
  • Remove tires, buckets, and other water-holding objects.
  • Change water and clean birdbaths at least once a week.
  • Prevent water from accumulating in pool covers.
  • Unclog gutters and down spouts.
  • Wear light colored, long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and socks.
  • Use insect repellents when outdoors (follow product instructions carefully).
  • Avoid outdoor activities in the early morning and evening, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Make sure screens fit tightly in doors and windows.

 


Most human infections are mild. Symptoms usually appear 3 to 15 days after infection, and include fever, headache, body aches, occasional skin rash and swollen lymph glands. More severe infection may be marked by headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, paralysis, and, rarely, death.


The county is spraying for mosquitoes on a regular basis in areas where WNV has been discovered.



County Health Department Working with Pool Operators to Meet New Federal Safety Standards
Over the next several months, the Saint Louis County Department of Health will be working with the owners and operators of public swimming pools and spas to ensure that Saint Louis County is in compliance with new federal safety standards. “Visiting the local swimming pool is a summer tradition and we want to make sure it is a safe tradition,” said Dr. Dolores Gunn, director of the Health Department. President Bush signed the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act into law on December 19, 2007. The act established a federal standard for pool and spa drain covers in order to reduce the risk of people being caught by the suction of the drain. Earlier this year, the Saint Louis County Council enacted changes to the County Public Water Recreation Facilities Code to mirror these new federal standards. Nationally, an average of 283 people drown every year, and more than 2,700 children under the age of five (5) are treated in emergency rooms for submersion injuries – including suction entrapment. Last year the federal government acted to reduce such risks. The Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act is named after the granddaughter of former Secretary of State James Baker. Graeme Baker died tragically in June of 2002 after being trapped under water by a spa drain. Over the next several weeks, information will be delivered to all licensed pool and spa owners and operators in Saint Louis County detailing the new requirements and explaining how to bring their facilities into compliance. Facilities must be in compliance on or before December 20, 2008, or, if closed for the winter, must be in compliance before reopening for use by the public. The language of the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act can be viewed at http://www.cpsc.gov/pssa.pdf and a summary of the act can be viewed at http://www.apsp.org/clientresources/documents/2Summaryof%20P-SSafetyAct.pdf.


  • Section 2 13.pdf
  • Owner Operator Suction Entrapment Letter.pdf
  • Verification of Compliance Form Suction Entrapment Hazard.pdf
  • Pool Plan Review Application Suction Entrapment.pdf
  • Suction Entrapment FAQ.pdf
  • Pool Code Rules and Regulations


 Mosquitoes Test Positive for West Nile Virus in Saint Louis County; Heavy Rains Boost non-WNV Mosquito Population


The first mosquitoes to test positive for the West Nile Virus this year have been discovered throughout the county and the non-WNV mosquito population has increased as a result of the recent heavy rains, according to the Saint Louis County Department of Health.

Although no human cases have been reported, the WNV-carrying mosquito has been discovered in various locations throughout the county.  Positive results have been reported in mosquitoes in several North County areas, including Jennings, Bellefontaine Neighbors, Florissant, Spanish Lake, and Black Jack.

Central County and West County locations include University City, Clayton, Richmond Heights, and Ladue, and Pagedale, Vinita Park, Normandy and Northwoods.

West county locations include Creve Coeur, Chesterfield, and Town and Country.

WNV-carrying mosquitoes have also been detected in Jefferson Barracks County Park in South County.

“Positive mosquito tests are a reminder that preventative measures are important,” said County Health Department Director Dr. Dolores J. Gunn.  “Even though serious West Nile Virus cases in humans are rare, it is important to minimize our exposure. We can do this by eliminating opportunities for mosquitoes to breed and multiply and protect ourselves by using repellants,” Gunn said.


Floodwater mosquitoes, which do not carry WNV, have been emerging in recent weeks and are active in daylight hours as well as being attracted to bright lights at night.


Here are steps residents can take to reduce the opportunities for mosquitoes to flourish:


  • Standing water: don't stand for it! At least once a week, drain water from garbage cans, buckets, toys, flowerpots, wading pools, pet dishes, and other objects that can collect water. Change water in birdbaths at least once a week.
  • Look for products containing the active ingredient methoprene or Bti (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis) to place in birdbaths or ponds, to prevent mosquitoes from developing.
  • Keep gutters cleaned out and repair any tears in door and window screens.
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and light colors outdoors.
  • Spray clothing with repellents containing DEET. 

The Saint Louis County Health Department routinely collects mosquito samples to test and help determine where to focus control efforts.  Vector Control monitors and treats standing water in public areas as part of its preventative larviciding program. To find out where the county will be spraying, call 615-4BUG (4284) for the nightly mosquito-spraying schedule.


For more information on mosquito prevention, contact the County Vector Control office at 314-727-3097 or log on to www.stlouisco.com/doh.



Salmonella Outbreak


Although there have been no cases of salmonella linked to the tomato outbreak in the St. Louis area, many restaurants and stores are pulling tomatoes from menus and shelves. Click on these links for more information about salmonella which has affected people in 16 states.


  • FDA Recall Information
  • FDA Recall Release
  • CDC Tomato Outbreak Information
  • St. Louis Outbreak Information
  • Missouri DHSS Health Advisory

 



Health Department Offers Information About Bats


The warmer weather marks the awakening of bats from hibernation, and the Saint Louis County Department of Health is cautioning residents to avoid handling the animals, since some can carry rabies.  A bat that was positive for rabies was recovered from a home in Webster Groves last week.


Any county resident who encounters a live or dead bat in their home is urged to call the health department.  Residents should not attempt to capture a live bat but should confine it to the room where it is discovered so animal control officers can collect it for rabies testing. 


Never release a bat found in a home if it was present while people were sleeping or in the same room with children or adults who, due to health or age, may not be able to describe the extent of their exposure. 


During business hours, residents who live north of Page Avenue should call 831-6500. Residents, who live south of Page Avenue, should call 726-6655. After business hours, and on weekends and holidays, county residents should call Saint Louis County Police at 889-2341.


Last year, 439 bats were tested and eight had rabies, said La’Rhonda Garrett, DOH Program Manager of Vector Control and Veterinary Services.


Health officials urge people to be aware of and cautious around wildlife, especially bats, and to avoid direct contact with any animal that is behaving strangely. Children should be taught to stay a safe distance away from any unknown animals.


Garrett said people should check with their veterinarians on the immunization status of their pets. Because rabies can be readily passed from wild animals to domestic pets, the first line of defense is to make sure all cats and dogs are properly vaccinated, as required by county ordinances. Once transmitted, the disease of rabies has no cure and is almost always fatal.


Most bats don't carry rabies, and in fact perform a beneficial service by eating large quantities of insects. But if one bat in colony contracts rabies, chances are it will spread to other members of the colony.


For more information, about pet vaccinations, or to report animal bites, please call the Saint Louis County Department of Health, North Animal Shelter at 314-831-6500; or the South Shelter at 314-726-6655, or visit www.stlouisco.com/doh and click on Animal Control.



County Health Department Urges People to Remember the Uninsured during National Cover the Uninsured Week


National Cover the Uninsured Week runs from April 27th through May 3rd, and the Saint Louis County Department of Health is taking the opportunity to remind people that many county residents either have no health insurance or remain underinsured.


It is estimated that more than 89,000 residents of Saint Louis County currently do not have health insurance, and it is not just the poor and unemployed who are affected: Eight (8) out of ten (10) people without insurance come from working families, and at least 82% of them earn more than the federal poverty line.


Those who are uninsured tend to live sicker and die sooner.  Uninsured children are 70% less likely to receive treatment for common conditions such as ear infections and 30% less likely to receive medical attention when injured.  In an average year, nearly 40% of uninsured adults skip a recommended medical test or treatment.  In addition, the uninsured are less likely to receive any preventive care to help them avoid such problems in the first place.


“It is unfortunate that in a nation with so much to offer, a significant number of people still do not have basic medical insurance,” said Dr. Dolores Gunn, director of the County Health Department.


Not having health insurance can result in minor illnesses becoming major ones because care is delayed.  According to the Institute of Medicine and the Urban Institute, an estimated 18,000 to 22,000 Americans die every year because they lack health insurance.  The Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured reported that the uninsured are also more likely to be hospitalized for conditions that could have been avoided, such as pneumonia and uncontrolled diabetes.


Everyone is affected by this problem – not just those without insurance.


“Lack of health insurance is not just a problem for those who have difficulty obtaining or paying for medical care,” said Dr. Gunn.  “It is a problem for all of us because it drives up the overall cost of medical care for everyone by forcing providers to shift costs elsewhere.”


To help meet the basic health care needs of Saint Louis County, the Department of Health runs three Health Centers where any resident of the county can receive a full spectrum of primary medical care services, including adult medical services, pediatric services for children, dental services, testing and counseling for HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, immunizations (including travel immunizations), lead screening and treatment services, eye care, foot care, nutrition counseling, and WIC services.  Proof of residency is required, and those without insurance will be billed on a sliding fee scale based on income.


The three health centers are located throughout the county as follows:


John C. Murphy Health Center
6065 Helen Avenue
Berkeley, Missouri  63134


North Central Community Health Center (Pine Lawn)
4000 Jennings Station Road
Saint Louis, Missouri  63121


South County Health Center
4580 South Lindbergh Boulevard
Sunset Hills, Missouri  63127


For a complete list of services offered at the county’s three health centers, visit the health centers’ website at https://stlouisco.com/doh/hlthctrs/services.html.


For information about low-cost or free health care coverage for children, call 1-877-KIDS-NOW (1-877-543-7669).


For more information about Cover the Uninsured Week, visit the national website for the event at www.covertheuninsured.org.



County Health Department to Consolidate Two Health Center Clinics


On Thursday, May 1st, 2008, the Saint Louis County Department of Health will be consolidating the pediatric and women’s health clinics at the John C. Murphy Health Center with similar clinics located at the North Central Community Health Center and the South County Health Center.  All other services offered at the John C. Murphy Health Center will remain unchanged, and the family physicians there will still be able to provide full health services for both women and children. 


No staff positions are being eliminated and the total availability of services is not being reduced (although some staff are being relocated from the John C. Murphy Health Center to the other two health centers).  The Health Department anticipates that the changes will result in better services for the Medicaid and managed-care population needing same-day pediatric and women’s health services.


“We are very proud of our facilities and services, but we are always trying to improve,” said Dr. Dolores Gunn, director of the Health Department.  “This change is a part of that process.”


Staff at the three health centers have been working for months to bring about the changes – changes that have included not only the moving of staff and equipment, but the education of patients, other staff, and the general public.


“We recognize that some clients may be concerned about these changes, but I want to assure everyone who comes through our doors that no matter what clinic a county resident visits, they will have their medical needs assessed and addressed,” said Dr. Michael Railey, director of the Research and Medical Services Division of the Health Department.


Staff have been working with clients to reschedule appointments, provide directions to health centers they may not have visited before, and respond to questions about the change.


The three health centers run by the Saint Louis County Department of Health offer a full spectrum of primary care services for the residents of Saint Louis County.  This includes adult medical services for the general public, pediatric services for children, dental services, testing and counseling for HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, immunizations (including for those traveling abroad), lead screening and treatment services, eye care, foot care, nutrition counseling, and WIC services.


All county residents are welcome (proof of residency is required).


The three health centers are located throughout the county as follows:


John C. Murphy Health Center
6065 Helen Avenue
Berkeley, Missouri  63134


North Central Community Health Center (Pine Lawn)
4000 Jennings Station Road
Saint Louis, Missouri  63121


South County Health Center
4580 South Lindbergh Boulevard
Sunset Hills, Missouri  63127


For a complete list of services offered at the county’s three health centers, visit the health centers’ website at https://stlouisco.com/doh/hlthctrs/services.html.



County Residents Can “Go Green” With Proper Disposal of Household Chemicals
Saint Louis County Department of Health sponsors free events for residents to drop off unwanted household chemicals


It’s spring and that means it’s time for the biannual Household Chemical Collection Events, sponsored by the Saint Louis County Department of Health.  County residents can bring their unwanted household products such as paint thinner, cleaning solutions, motor oil, insecticides, and other products that can pose health hazards if not properly disposed.


Drop-off events will be held on three Saturdays:  April 26th, May 3rd, and May 17th.  (Event details can be found on page 2.)  All events run from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., rain or shine.  The events are free of charge and are open to all Saint Louis County residents.


“Now more than ever, people are interested in living a ‘green’ lifestyle, and these events offer a great way for residents to do something to benefit the environment,” said Dr. Dolores J. Gunn, Director of the Saint Louis County Department of Health. 


Gunn said that this program has been very popular with residents and that she hopes to see even more participation this year.  The county has also spent a great deal of effort to develop a new curbside recycling program that is expected to significantly increase residential recycling. 


“Residents can now recycle more items than ever before, and in the most convenient way possible – by tossing everything together into a recycling cart (no sorting required) and just rolling it to the curb,” Gunn said.


The handling of chemical products, however, requires special disposal and recycling methods, and residents should continue to save these items for the chemical collection events, Gunn added.  While recycling is a good option for handling these hazardous materials, the Department of Health emphasizes the importance of practicing source reduction. 


“We recommend that residents avoid having excess materials in the first place,” said Laura Yates, Waste Management Specialist.  “Consumers should buy only what they need or use products up entirely.”


The cost for the household chemical events is covered by the Saint Louis County landfill surcharge fund.  Proof of residency, such as a driver’s license or tax bill, will be required.  For more information on these events, please call the Department of Health at 314-615-8958 or visit the Web site at www.RecycleSaintLouis.com.


All events are from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. – Rain or shine!
 
Saturday, April 26 South County Center
    (formerly Westfield Shoppingtown – South County)
    South of the Dillard’s and Sears stores
    (Enter from Lemay Ferry Road, south of South Lindbergh Blvd.)
Saturday, May 3  Westminster Christian Academy – Town and Country Campus
   

800 Maryville Centre Drive


   

(Just south of Highway 40 off the Maryville Centre Drive exit)


Saturday, May 17  St. Louis Community College – Florissant Valley Campus
   

(On Pershall Road just east of the I-270 and Elizabeth Avenue exit)


 
For maps and directions, visit www.RecycleSaintLouis.com.

ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS: Paints, stains, varnishes, pesticides, herbicides, poisons, gasoline and other fuels, solvents and strippers, aerosols, motor oil and filters, gas cylinders (BBQ-pit size or smaller), fluorescent tubes, rechargeable batteries, anti-freeze, brake and transmission fluids, pool chemicals and other acids and bases, car batteries, wood preservatives, driveway sealant, and items containing mercury (such as thermometers, thermostats, and mercuric salts).

UNACCEPTABLE MATERIALS: Explosives and ammunition, radioactive waste, smoke detectors, medical waste, household trash, tires and other bulky items.

Materials from business, commercial, non-profit and government organizations are also prohibited.



County Health Department to Have More Convenient Hours at the Office of Vital Records


The Saint Louis County Department of Health is changing the hours at the Office of Vital Records to make it easier to get certified copies of birth and death certificates.  Starting on Monday, April 14th, 2008, the Office of Vital Records will begin operating on the following new schedule:


Mondays and Wednesdays   8:00 a.m. –   4:30 p.m.
Tuesdays and Thursdays

  8:00 a.m. –   6:00 p.m.


Fridays 10:00 a.m. –   2:30 p.m.
Saturdays   9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.


Birth and death certificates can also be purchased online or through the mail. Information about these methods can be found on their website at www.stlouisco.com/doh/vitals/vitals.html.


The Office of Vital Records can issue certified copies of birth and death certificates only for events that occurred in the state of Missouri.  Birth certificates are available for births that took place from 1920 to the present.  Death certificates are available for deaths that occurred from 1883 to the present; however, deaths that happened before 1980 must have occurred in Saint Louis County for the office to issue a record.


The Office of Vital Records is located on the first floor of 111 South Meramec Avenue in Clayton, Missouri (63105), and can be reached at (314) 615-1720.



County Health Department Recognizes Rockwood School District for Its Extraordinary Recycling Efforts


The Saint Louis County Department of Health is recognizing the Rockwood School District for its extraordinary efforts to implement recycling at each of its schools. 


Rockwood Science Coordinator Mike Szydlowski first proposed the idea of single-stream recycling in December of 2007, and by February of 2008, a pilot program was already up and running at seven (7) of the district’s 31 schools.


At a meeting of the County Council on Tuesday, April 8th, County Executive Charlie Dooley presented Rockwood School District with a proclamation praising their efforts.  Mike Szydlowski was present to accept the proclamation on the district’s behalf.


Dr. Dolores Gunn, director of the Health Department, also praised the efforts at Rockwood: “We are so pleased at the efforts being made by the Rockwood School District to implement single-stream recycling.  Recycling creates jobs, increases the lifespan of our landfills, and saves energy by reducing the amount of new raw materials we have to mine from the ground.”


Students, teachers, and administrators in the Rockwood School District are also excited by the successes realized so far.


“The pilot program has exceeded expectations and resulted in substantially more recyclable materials than we expected,” says Mike Szydlowski, who first proposed the idea last December.  “Should the program continue to be successful, Rockwood will expand its efforts to all district schools in the fall.”


The district has partnered with QRS Recycling to set up the single-stream method which allows all recyclables to be collected in a single container, making recycling easier than ever.


Rockwood students, teachers, custodians, and cafeteria workers are all engaged in the recycling effort.  Participating schools include: Rockwood Summit High School, Lafayette High School, Marquette High School, Rockwood South Middle School, Crestview Middle School, Kellison Elementary School, and Kehrs Mill Elementary School.


The recycling and reuse industry is a major job creator in the Saint Louis area.  There are currently about 16,000 people working locally in the industry with an annual payroll of almost $640 million.  Despite that, nearly $208 million of reusable materials are still being dumped into Missouri’s landfills every year.



County Health Department Urges Recycling During National Public Health Week


National Public Health Week runs from April 7th through April 13th.  It is a time set aside each year to recognize the many positive results of public health efforts throughout the nation and to focus on a specific public health theme.  The theme this year is: “Climate Change: Our Health in the Balance.”  The Saint Louis County Department of Health is urging residents to celebrate the week by recycling whenever possible. 


“There is nothing simpler and easier that residents can do to make Saint Louis a great place to live than recycle,” said Dr. Dolores Gunn, director of the Health Department. “Recycling creates jobs, increases the lifespan of our landfills, and saves energy by reducing the amount of new raw materials we have to mine from the ground.”


To increase awareness of National Public Health Week, the Saint Louis County Health Department is sponsoring several events this week, including recognizing the Rockwood School District for its extraordinary recycling efforts, encouraging employees to recycle, and holding an online contest for an emergency preparedness bag. (The online contest can be found at the Saint Louis County Department of Health website at www.stlouisco.com/doh.)


On average, more than 70% of residential trash is recyclable.  Despite that, $208 million of reusable materials are dumped into Missouri’s landfills every year, and replacing those reusable materials with new raw materials takes as much energy as would be needed to power 262,000 Missouri homes for a year – that’s about a $500 million energy bill!


Recycling also creates jobs in the Saint Louis area.  Currently there are nearly 16,000 people working locally in the recycling and reuse industry – an industry with an annual local payroll of almost $640 million.


The emphasis of this year’s National Public Health Week is on the small steps that ordinary people can take to positively affect the environment – everything from walking or riding a bike to work to shopping at a local farmers’ market, making healthier choices to improve one’s health, and teaching younger people about the importance of our environment.


For more information on National Public Health Week, please visit the national website for the event at www.NPHW.org.



 County Health Department Offers Free Tetanus Shots; Other Assistance to Those in Flood Areas


The Saint Louis County Department of Health is offering free tetanus booster shots to those who have been exposed to the recent flooding as well as free well water testing kits for residents with private wells that were affected by the flood. Those exposed to flood waters should get a tetanus booster shot if it has been more than 10 years since their last booster.


The booster shots are available at the South County Health Center; 4580 South Lindbergh Blvd., Sunset Hills. The Center’s hours are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Wednesday: 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.  The center is closed on the first Thursday morning of each month. Patients may call 314-842-1300 for more information.


Before using any water from a well following a flood, it is important to make sure that the water has not been contaminated.  DO NOT USE THE WATER UNTIL YOU ARE SURE IT IS SAFE.  Free well water testing kits for private wells will be available at the following County Health Department offices during the following days and hours for those residents who live in an area affected by the flood:


Saint Louis County Health Department – Main Office
111 South Meramec Avenue
Clayton, Missouri 63105
Monday – Friday; 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.


Saint Louis County Health Department - North County Satellite Office
Village Square Shopping Center
21 Village Square Drive (off Dunn Road)
Hazelwood, Missouri 63042
Monday - Friday; 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Saint Louis County Health Department - South County Satellite Office
Keller Plaza
4562 Lemay Ferry Road
Saint Louis, Missouri 63129
Monday - Friday; 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Saint Louis County Health Department - West County Satellite Office
Clarkson Wilson Centre
78 Clarkson Centre (off Clarkson Road)
Chesterfield, Missouri 63017
Monday - Friday; 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.


It is important that the instructions included with each well water testing kit be followed exactly.  Suspect well water must be collected as directed, then returned to the County Health Department no later than 30 hours after collection.  The testing of the collected well water from private wells will be done for free.


Household cleaning kits, provided by the Salvation Army, may be picked up at the Valley Park Fire Department, 55 Crescent Ave. and the Fenton Public Works Department, 700 Rudder Road. The kits include cleaning supplies, mops and other items for use in cleaning up flooded household areas.


Information about disinfecting contaminated wells and other water sources can be found at:


www.stlouisco.com/doh


 



County Health Department to Provide Free Well Water Testing for Residents in Flood-Stricken Areas

The Saint Louis County Department of Health will be offering free well water testing for private wells to Saint Louis County residents who live in areas of the county affected by recent flooding.

"Public health is often threatened by natural disasters and this is no exception," said Dr. Dolores J. Gunn, Director of the Health Department. "One of the dangers residents may face following the flood is contaminated well water. We want to do our part to make it as easy as possible for residents to ensure that the water they and their families use is safe."

Before using any water from a well following a flood, it is important to make sure that the water has not been contaminated. DO NOT USE THE WATER UNTIL YOU ARE SURE IT IS SAFE. Free well water testing kits for private wells will be available at the following County Health Department offices during the following days and hours for those residents who live in an area affected by the flood:

Saint Louis County Health Department - Main Office
111 South Meramec Avenue
Clayton, Missouri 63105
Monday - Friday; 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Saint Louis County Health Department - North County Satellite Office
Village Square Shopping Center
21 Village Square Drive (off Dunn Road)
Hazelwood, Missouri 63042
Monday - Friday; 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Saint Louis County Health Department - South County Satellite Office
Keller Plaza
4562 Lemay Ferry Road
Saint Louis, Missouri 63129
Monday - Friday; 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Saint Louis County Health Department - West County Satellite Office
Clarkson Wilson Centre
78 Clarkson Centre (off Clarkson Road)
Chesterfield, Missouri 63017
Monday - Friday; 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

It is important that the instructions included with each well water testing kit be followed exactly. Suspect well water must be collected as directed, then returned to the County Health Department no later than 30 hours after collection. The testing of the collected well water from private wells will be done for free.

Information about disinfecting contaminated wells and other water sources can be found at:


www.stlouisco.com/doh


 



County Health Department Distributes Recycling Carts


The Saint Louis County Department of Health has begun delivering 64- and 35-gallon recycling carts to all one- and two-family residences throughout unincorporated Saint Louis County as part of their ongoing efforts to increase the number of county residents who recycle.


“Recycling isn’t just good for the environment,” said Dr. Dolores Gunn, Director of the Health Department, “It’s also good for the economy because it helps us save energy, create local jobs, and keep down the cost of trash collection.” 


Saint Louis County currently has a waste diversion rate of only 30% (70% of all waste is put into landfills).  The county has set a waste diversion rate goal of 50% by the year 2010.  It is hoped that the delivery of these new recycling carts will encourage residents to increase the amount of waste they recycle.


The delivery of the recycling carts started in Waste Collection District #3 (see map at https://stlouisco.com/trashrecycle/districtmap.pdf). Once deliveries in District #3 have been completed, the department will then deliver carts to the other seven (7) districts in the following order: #2, #1, #5, #6, #7, #8, and #4. It is expected that all deliveries will be completed by mid-April (an estimated schedule of deliveries can be found at https://stlouisco.com/doh/waste/cartdelivery.html).


All recycling carts come with a “Get Rolling” booklet that explains why residents have received the cart, what the guidelines are for using the cart, and what to do if they decide they don’t want to keep the cart.  Residents will have the option of replacing the larger 64-gallon cart with a smaller 35-gallon one or simply having the cart picked back up and taken away.  Recycling is voluntary in Saint Louis County – although county residents are strongly urged to recycle, they are not required to do so.


The Saint Louis County Department of Health is emphasizing the following benefits of recycling:


  • It saves energy by reducing the need to mine and refine new raw materials (the energy needed to replace the reusable materials dumped annually into Missouri’s landfills is enough to power 262,000 Missouri homes for a year – approximately a $500 million energy bill).1
  • It creates jobs because the recycling and reuse industry is a significant driver of economic activity in the Saint Louis area, employing nearly 16,000 people with an annual payroll of $639,910,000.2
  • It saves landfill space, which helps keep waste hauling rates lower (as local landfill space is depleted, haulers will have to take trash to landfills that are further away, thus increasing the cost of transporting each load).
  • It preserves natural resources because manufacturers can reuse existing materials to make new products ($208 million of reusable materials are dumped in Missouri’s landfills every year).1

1 Source: Missouri Department of Natural Resources, 2008


2 Source: St. Louis Metropolitan Area Recycling Economic Information Study conducted by University of Missouri-St. Louis for St. Louis-Jefferson Solid Waste Management District, 2002



County Health Department Tracks Jump in Flu Cases


“The recent dramatic increase in the number of reported flu cases in the area is a reminder that it is important to get a flu shot and adopt other preventative measures,” said Saint Louis County Health Department Director Dr. Dolores J. Gunn.


The county health department received reports of 561 new flu cases for the week ending January 27, compared to 166 cases the previous week. The groups most affected this flu season are late teens and adults. Last year, the peak age range was between 5 and 14.   


Flu Surveillance Chart


Influenza by Age and Type


“It’s important to get a flu shot for three reasons, your health, the health of others who you may expose if you have the flu and, as has been illustrated over the past week, to minimize the impact of the flu season on the availability of services from area hospital emergency departments.  We may think of the influenza season as a routine annual event, but we should recognize both the impact it has on our health as well as the burden it places on emergency medical services,” Gunn said.


There are other steps you can take to reduce your chances of getting the flu:


  • Try to keep a distance of three feet away from others.
  • Always cover your mouth when you sneeze or cough. If you don’t have a tissue, sneeze or cough into your sleeve
  • Wash your hands frequently, especially after sneezing, coughing or blowing your nose
  • Stay home if you are ill

To find out where to go for vaccinations (or to find more information about the flu), call the Flu Vaccination Hotline or visit the new Saint Louis County Flu website:


314-644-4FLU (4358)


www.SaintLouisCountyFlu.com



County Volunteer Medical Reserve Corps Awarded Grant


A $10,000 grant to further develop and expand the Medical Reserve Corps has been awarded to the St. Louis County Department of Health by the National Association of City and County Health Officials (NACCHO). 


The grant will allow the County to complete recruitment and training of fifty nurse volunteers and to begin recruiting volunteer interpreters.  These volunteers will be activated when public health emergencies require the distribution of medications or vaccinations.


Recruitment of nurses for the Medical Reserve Corps started in September of 2007 and 25 nurses are currently undergoing training.  For more information, please contact Saralou Hendrickson at 314-615-1635 or email her at [email protected]