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Department of Health Newsroom 2008


Dec. 20, 2000: Update: Lost poodle goes home for Christmas!
Dec. 19, 2000: Help lost poodle go home for Christmas!
Dec. 12, 2000: Saint Louis County DOH offers flu vaccine - Brentwood.
Dec. 5, 2000: December 26 kicks off holiday recycling collection event.
Dec. 5, 2000: Saint Louis County Department of Health offers flu vaccine.
Nov. 6, 2000: DOH supports Thanksgiving Week law enforcement effort to stop unsafe drinking and driving.
Oct. 31, 2000: Saint Louis County Department of Health confirms first case of influenza.
Oct. 13, 2000: DOH participates in National Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, Oct. 22-28, 2000.
Oct. 9, 2000: County residents can drop off household hazardous chemicals at upcoming collection events.
Oct. 9, 2000: Department of Health participates in National Radon Action Week, October 15-21, 2000.
Oct. 6, 2000: County Health Department reports rabid bat #13.
Oct. 5, 2000: Flu immunizations recommended for high risk patients first.
Oct. 2, 2000: Breast cancer screening is essential for early detection.
Sep. 22, 2000: Gateway Green Exposition features "green" building products.
Sep. 22, 2000: October is National Adopt-a-Shelter-Dog Month.
Sep. 22, 2000: County Health Department Offers Family Mental Health Services To Residents.
Sep. 14, 2000: County Health Department reports rabid bats in Maryland Heights, Ellisville.
Sep. 13, 2000: Gateway Green Exposition News.
Aug. 30, 2000: Hot Weather Health Warning.
Aug. 29, 2000: MO Health Department issues state-wide hot weather health advisory.
Aug. 29, 2000: Proposed asbestos regulation and public hearing.
Aug. 25, 2000: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING - Waste processing facility.
Aug. 17, 2000: Responsible owners pick up after pets.
Jul. 25, 2000:County Health Department reports sixth and seventh rabid bats of season.
Jul. 17, 2000:County Health Department reports fifth rabid bat of season - Shrewsbury resident undergoes series of rabies shots.
Jul. 17, 2000:Information available on hepatitis A requirement.
Jul. 7, 2000: Heat Warning for County, region.
Jul. 6, 2000: "Safety Town" event at Pine Lawn Health Center offers children free bicycle helmets, car seats.
Jun. 28, 2000: Keep pets safe from fireworks.
Jun. 26, 2000: "Safety Town" event at South County Health Center offers children free bicycle helmets, car seats.
Jun. 19, 2000: Countdown: Health inspectors will begin enforcing Hepatitis A requirement next month.
Jun. 16, 2000: "Safety Town" event at County Health Center offers children free bicycle helmets, car seats.
Jun. 7, 2000: DOH reports second rabid bat of season.
Jun. 6, 2000: June is National Adopt-a-Shelter-Cat Month.
Jun. 6, 2000: MO Department of Health warns Missourians to take precautions to prevent heat-related illness and death.
May 25, 2000: County Health Department reports first rabid bat of season.
May 16, 2000: Hepatitis A Ordinance brochure.
May 12, 2000: Saint Louis County Department of Health salutes nurses!
Apr. 24, 2000: DOH observes Mental Health Month in May.
Apr. 18, 2000: DOH supports Childhood Immunization Week, April 16-22.
Apr. 4, 2000: Upcoming collection event will let residents drop off household hazardous chemicals.
Apr. 3, 2000: Local effort aims to teach children best way to prevent spread of illness.
Apr. 3, 2000: Saint Louis County Department of Health highlights impact of public health on citizens' lives.
Mar. 23, 2000: Saint Louis County Department Of Health provides daily pollen counts for metropolitan area.
Mar. 16, 2000: Upcoming collection events for recyclable household chemicals.
Jan. 28, 2000: February is National Children's Dental Month.
Jan. 18, 2000: Residents recycle leftover fuels and paints at collection event.
Jan. 18, 2000: WIC scores big on customer satisfaction.
Jan. 13, 2000: Saint Louis County will open new health center in North County.
Jan. 12, 2000: January 26 is School Nurses Day.

UPDATE: Lost Poodle Goes Home for Christmas!

December 20, 2000. The Animal Control office at Saint Louis County Department of Health has identified the owner of a lost poodle. The small black poodle, which was found on the parking lot at the St. Louis Galleria last week during a snowstorm, will be home for Christmas! The well-groomed dog was wearing a leash and collar but had no ID tags.


"The dog's owner had a fire in their home and was staying in temporary quarters," said Dr. Knox, manager of Animal Control. "The dog got away while being walked near the Galleria. This is an example of why it's so important to have proper identification. A tag, collar or microchip is a free phone call home for a lost pet."


Dr. Knox added that pets can quickly become disoriented in cold snowy weather. If a pet is lost, owners should check local animal shelters. Saint Louis County Animal Control operates two shelters: South, 77 Hunter Road in Ladue (314-726-6655); and North, 4100 Seven Hills (314-831-6500).


Contact: Dan Knox, D.V.M., Manager
Animal Control, (314) 727-7017,   Pager: 430-6208

Help Lost Poodle Go Home for Christmas!

December 19, 2000. The Animal Control office at Saint Louis County Department of Health needs your help getting a lost poodle home for Christmas. The small black poodle was found on the parking lot at the St. Louis Galleria in Richmond Heights on Wednesday, December 13, during a snowstorm. The well-groomed dog was wearing a leash and collar but had no ID tags.


"This dog belongs to someone," said Dr. Knox, manager of Animal Control. "This is an example of why it's so important to have proper identification. A tag, collar or microchip is a free phone call home for a lost pet." If a pet is lost, owners should check local animal shelters.


Dr. Knox added that pets can quickly become disoriented in cold snowy weather. "This is a really nice dog," he said, "a cute little guy that appears to be about two or three years old, and I'm sure he'd like to be home for the holidays!"


The animal shelter has received inquiries on adopting the poodle. If it is not claimed by the end of this week it may be adopted.


Photo Opportunity:
Lost Poodle
Saint Louis County Animal Shelter
77 Hunter Ave, Ladue


CONTACT: Dan Knox, D.V.M., Manager,
Animal Control, 727-7017 Pager 430-6208

Saint Louis County Department of Health Offers Flu Vaccine.

December 12, 2000. Saint Louis County Department of Health, in partnership with Alliance Blue Cross Blue Shield, is holding a community flu clinic at the Brentwood Community Center (2505 South Brentwood Blvd.) from 8:30 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. on Monday, December 18.


There is no out-of-pocket cost for those with Medicare Part B coverage. Flu shots are $12 for others. Pneumonia shots are also being offered at $25 each. Following CDC guidelines, flu vaccine is offered to persons age 50 and older, and anyone with chronic medical conditions.


For updated information on flu clinics please call Alliance Blue Cross Blue Shield (314- 644-4FLU); the Visiting Nurses Association (314-918-7171 x1000); or Walgreens Drug Stores (1-800-FLU-9950).


With the delay in flu vaccine production this year, it is very important for persons with influenza symptoms to avoid spreading their illness through contact with others. Symptoms of flu include fever, headache, muscle aches, fatigue, sore throat and cough. Public health officials recommend washing your hands frequently, and staying home if you experience symptoms of influenza.


CONTACT:
Steve Fine, Director, Division of Public Health and Ancillary Services
(314) 615-6445 (Pager: 314-430-2671)
Michael P. Williams, Ph.D., Program Director, Communicable Disease Control
(314) 615-1630
Melinda Sanderson, Quality Improvement Specialist
Alliance Blue Cross Blue Shield, (314) 923-4949

December 26 Kicks Off Holiday Recycling Collection Event.
Sponsored by the Saint Louis County Department of Health and the Saint Louis County Department of Parks

December 5, 2000. Get ready to clean up your holiday clutter and save landfill space at the same time! The Saint Louis County Health and Parks Departments are sponsoring their third annual holiday recycling event from December 26, 2000 to January 3, 2001.


Residents of Saint Louis County are invited to bring their holiday recyclables to the following locations:


  • North County Complex (Veterans Memorial, 2577 Redman);
  • Queeny Park (550 Weidman);
  • Kennedy Complex (6050 Wells);
  • McDonnell Park (Adie at Link Rd); and
  • Lemay Park (Military at Lemay Ferry).

Each location is open from 9 am-4 pm daily, with the exceptions of December 31 (open from 9 a.m. to noon) and January 1 (closed). The collection event is free of charge.


"Last year, with more than 6,000 people participating in the collection events, we diverted more than 33 tons of wrapping paper, boxes, newspapers and other holiday recyclables from landfills," said Dr. Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director of the Saint Louis County Department of Health. "Instead of going to the landfill, that holiday waste was recycled into products such as paper towels, tissue paper and boxes." By volume, last year's collection could have filled a baseball diamond more than five feet deep.


Residents can bring items such as wrapping paper (no foils), gift bags (no foils), gift boxes, cardboard boxes, greeting cards, phone books, catalogues, magazines, junk mail, home office paper, and newspapers.


The event is paid for by Saint Louis County landfill surcharge funds.


Anyone with questions can contact the Saint Louis County Department of Health at (314) 615-8958.


Contact: Lora Mather, (314) 615-6878
Saint Louis County Department of Health

Saint Louis County Department of Health Offers Flu Vaccine.

December 5, 2000. Saint Louis County Department of Health, in partnership with Alliance Blue Cross Blue Shield, is holding two community flu clinics this week. Flu shots will be offered Thursday, December 7, at the Bridgeton Community Center at 4201 Fee Fee Road; and on Friday, December 8, at the Ferguson-Florissant School Administration Building, at 1005 Waterford. Hours are from 8:30 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. both days.


There is no out-of-pocket cost for those with Medicare Part B coverage. Flu shots are $12 for others. Pneumonia shots are also being offered at $25 each. Following CDC guidelines, flu vaccine is offered to persons age 50 and older, and anyone with chronic medical conditions.


For updated information on flu clinics please call Alliance Blue Cross Blue Shield (314- 644-4FLU); the Visiting Nurses Association (314-918-7171x1000); or Walgreens Drug Stores (1-800-FLU-9950).


With the delay in flu vaccine production this year, it is very important for persons with influenza symptoms to avoid spreading their illness through contact with others. Symptoms of flu include fever, headache, muscle aches, fatigue, sore throat and cough. Public health officials recommend washing your hands frequently, and staying home if you experience symptoms of influenza.


CONTACT:
Steve Fine, Director, Division of Public Health and Ancillary Services
(314) 615-6445 (Pager: 314-430-2671)
Michael P. Williams, Ph.D., Program Director
Communicable Disease Control - (314) 615-1630
Melinda Sanderson, Quality Improvement Specialist
Alliance Blue Cross Blue Shield - (314) 923-4949

SAINT LOUIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SUPPORTS THANKSGIVING WEEK LAW ENFORCEMENT EFFORT TO STOP DRIVERS WHO DRINK, TRANSPORT KIDS & FAIL TO BUCKLE THEM UP.

November 6, 2000. Saint Louis County Department of Health today announced its support of a national mobilization this Thanksgiving holiday - Operation ABC: America Buckles Up Children. During the week of November 20-26, law enforcement agencies across America will step up enforcement to protect children from riding unbuckled and from impaired drivers.


Contrary to popular belief, the majority of children who die in alcohol-related vehicle crashes are killed not by an impaired driver who crashes into them but by the impaired driver who is transporting them.


"We know that impaired drivers kill children. These terrible tragedies are well documented," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director, Saint Louis County Department of Health. "It's shocking to learn that most often, impaired drivers - parents or caregivers - are the cause of the children's deaths."


A recent study found that nearly two out of three children under age 14 who were killed in alcohol-related crashes were riding with drivers who had been drinking, according to a report published in the May 2000 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study, which analyzed a decade of national crash statistics, also found that more than 80 percent of the children who died were not buckled into seat belts or child safety seats.


"Although only law enforcement officers can write the tickets, we stand firmly behind the lifesaving message each ticket delivers," said Dr. Livingston. "Saint Louis County Department of Health is not only a health department, we're parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles who want to protect our children. The Thanksgiving Operation ABC Mobilization is the kind of broad community-based movement our nation needs to save children's lives."


Contact: Mary Kay Wolf, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
(314) 615-8338

Saint Louis County Department of Health Confirms First Case of Influenza.

October 31, 2000. The first case of influenza in Saint Louis County was confirmed in a 54-year-old female resident of University City. Health officials identified the virus as Type A. Symptoms of flu include fever, headache, muscle aches, fatigue, sore throat and cough.


Limited influenza vaccine supplies are now available in the St. Louis area. For information please call the Visiting Nurses Association (314-918-7171x1000); Blue Cross Blue Shield (314- 644-4FLU); or Walgreens Drug Stores (1-800-FLU-9950). High-risk residents seeking a source for the flu shot may call Saint Louis County Department of Health at 314-615-1630 for referrals.


With the delay in flu vaccine production this year, it is very important for persons with influenza symptoms to avoid spreading their illness through contact with others, particularly high-risk individuals, such as residents of nursing homes. At greatest risk of life threatening complications from the flu are individuals over 65 and anyone with a compromised immune system or chronic illness such as diabetes, heart or lung disease and children with asthma.


"Handwashing is still the best and easiest way to prevent the spread of colds and flu," according to Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director of Saint Louis County Department of Health. Public health officials recommend washing your hands frequently, and staying home if you experience symptoms of influenza.


Dr. Livingston reminds residents to "heed the Surgeon General's request that healthy persons defer their flu shot until December when supplies of vaccine are adequate. The elderly and chronically ill should be first in line while supplies are limited."


Saint Louis County Department of Health will partner again this year with Alliance Blue Cross Blue Shield in scheduling community flu clinics. Times and locations should be available in late November, when a vaccine shipment is expected. For recorded information please call (314) 644-4FLU.


Flu strains expected to be prevalent this year include A/Panama, A/New Caledonia, and B/Yamanashi.


CONTACT:
Steve Fine, Director, Division of Public Health and Ancillary Services
(314) 615-6445   (Pager: 314-430-2671)
Michael P. Williams, Ph.D., Program Director
Communicable Disease Control: (314) 615-1630

Saint Louis County Department of Health Participates in National Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, October 22-28, 2000.

October 13, 2000. Despite efforts at education and prevention, children in the Saint Louis County area continue to be poisoned by lead from peeling lead-based paint, lead-contaminated dust and other sources in their homes. To draw attention to the problem, Saint Louis County Department of Health is participating in National Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, October 22-28.


Lead poisoning affects virtually every system in the body, and often occurs with no distinctive symptoms. Lead can damage a child's central nervous system, kidneys, and reproductive system and, at higher levels, can cause coma, convulsions, and death. Even low levels of lead are harmful and are associated with decreased intelligence, impaired neurobehavioral development, decreased stature and growth, and impaired hearing acuity.


Nationally, almost one million preschool age children have enough lead in their blood to harm them, according to Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director. This includes approximately 816 children in Saint Louis County. The Department of Health encourages all physicians to test children who are less than six years old for lead poisoning.


Children could be at risk if they reside in homes built prior to 1978. Living in a newer home doesn't guarantee an environment free of lead hazards. Antique or recycled toys or other household furnishings could be coated with lead based paints. Occupational sources from adults in the household are another possible area of concern.


"Saint Louis County Department of Health has been working in lead poisoning prevention for more than 20 years," said Dr. Livingston. For more information on lead poison prevention, please visit our web site at www.stlouisco.com/doh/ or call (314) 615-LEAD (615-5323).


Contact: Brenda Quarles, Program Manager
Lead Poison Prevention, (314) 615-5323

County Residents Can Drop Off Household Hazardous Chemicals at Upcoming Collection Events.

October 9, 2000. Fall cleanup may be a little easier for Saint Louis County residents, as the Department of Health is hosting several one-day events for household chemical drop-off. All Saint Louis County residents are welcome, and it's free! The costs are covered by Saint Louis County landfill surcharge funds. Proof of residency, such as a driver's license or tax bill, will be required.


Improper disposal of leftover household chemicals can be especially harmful to the environment and public health. Recyclable materials that will be accepted include latex and oil-based paint, gasoline, fuels, solvents, antifreeze, motor oil and lead acid batteries. This program provides a safe alternative for residents to properly manage these potentially hazardous products. (Other household chemicals, pesticides, explosives, tires, bulky items, or general household trash will not be accepted. Business and commercial materials are also prohibited.)


For more information on these events or other activities, please call the Saint Louis County Department of Health Recycling Hotline at (314) 286-9200, or visit our web site at www.stlouisco.com/doh/ for details.


Recyclable Household Chemical Drop-off Events
9 AM - 3 PM / Rain or Shine
Saturday Oct. 14 South County Center Shopping Mall
(on Lemay Ferry Rd. near S. Lindbergh & Lemay Ferry)
Saturday Oct. 21 St. Louis Community College - Flo Valley
(on Pershall Rd. near I-270 & W. Florissant exit)
Sunday Nov. 5 University City Heman Park - Midland/Purdue Parking Lot
(1 Block South of Midland and Olive Street Blvd.)
Saturday Nov. 11 Spirit of St. Louis Airport - Chesterfield Valley
(Highway 40 West to Chesterfield Airport Rd.)

Contact: Laura Yates - Solid Waste Administrative Specialist
314-615-8958

Department of Health Participates in National Radon Action Week, October 15-21, 2000.

October 9, 2000. Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH) issues a reminder that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking. According to Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director, "a simple test can help determine if radon levels are a concern in your home."


Saint Louis County residents may contact the DOH Environmental Health Laboratories at (314) 615-8324 to obtain a home radon test kit, Dr. Livingston said. For a fee of $10 plus postage, a test kit will be provided, which the homeowner places in a designated location in the dwelling for a period of 5 to 7 full days. DOH Environmental Health Laboratories will evaluate the test results and the homeowner will receive a written report, with recommendations for correction of the problem if radon levels are at or above the EPA recommended action level.


Radon exists naturally in the earth. Unventilated areas such as basements are usually more susceptible to unhealthy levels of the gas, especially if there are cracks in foundation walls or floors. Problems can be corrected by sealing cracks, improving ventilation and using other radon risk reduction methods. For more information about radon, please call Saint Louis County Department of Health or visit our web site at www.stlouisco.com/doh/


Contact: Brenda Quarles, Program Manager
Industrial Hygiene, (314) 615-5323

County Health Department Reports Rabid Bat #13.

Found in St. Ann .

October 6, 2000. Animal Control officers from Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH) picked up a bat in the 10000 block of St. Charles Rock Road for rabies testing. Results received October 5 showed the bat tested positive for rabies. This is the thirteenth positive bat this year in Saint Louis County.


The family dog was playing with the bat. The homeowner touched the wing of the live bat but was not bitten. The dog has current rabies vaccinations, and will be given a booster as a precaution. Two unvaccinated cats in the home have been vaccinated to bring them into compliance with the County's ordinance, and to provide protection. The cats stay indoors and have little contact with the dog.


The homeowner is consulting with DOH communicable disease control staff on options, including possible post-exposure rabies prophylaxis (a series of five shots in the arm). Other individuals who were near the bat are being assessed for their degree of exposure. DOH has notified St. Ann authorities, and citizens in the area are reminded to assure that all pets are properly vaccinated.


Dan Knox, D.V.M., manager of animal control, stresses that "people should be aware and cautious of all wildlife, especially bats, and avoid contact with any animal that is behaving strangely." Dr. Knox advised pet owners to check with their veterinarians on the immunization status of their pets.


It's important to caution children not to touch any bat, especially if it's on the ground or unable to fly. Dr. Knox explains that the disease of rabies can interfere with a bat's sonar, causing it to crash into things and fall to the ground.


Most bats don't carry rabies, and in fact perform a beneficial service by eating large quantities of insects. But if one bat in a colony contracts rabies, the disease may spread to other members of the colony. Statewide, there have been 36 positive bats in Missouri this year.


Contact: Dan Knox, D.V.M., Manager, Animal Control
Pager: 314-430-6208

Flu Immunizations Recommended For High Risk Patients First.

Healthy Adults Should Delay Getting Shots.

October 5, 2000. Many adults will be getting their flu shots later than usual this year due to slow production of influenza vaccine. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals who have the highest risk of dying from influenza should have first priority for receiving the vaccine.


At high risk are all those age 65 and over, and anyone who is chronically ill, including those with cancer, suppressed immune systems, and children with asthma. Health care workers (in nursing homes, for example) as well as household members and others in close contact with high-risk individuals are also given priority in receiving vaccine.


Saint Louis County joins other state and local health officials and health providers in encouraging residents who are not in a high-risk group to delay receiving influenza vaccine until supplies are adequate.


Saint Louis County Department of Health will partner again this year with Alliance Blue Cross Blue Shield in scheduling community flu clinics. Times and locations should be available in late November or early December. For recorded information please call (314) 644-4FLU.


Flu Hotlines
Blue Cross / Blue Shield
Visiting Nurses Association
Walgreens Drug Store
  (314) 644-4FLU
  (314) 918-8595
  1 800 FLU-9950

The Saint Louis County Department of Health Home Care Agency will provide flu shots to homebound persons for a minimal fee of $10 per residence when vaccine becomes available. County residents may call (314) 615-1787 for more information on the home health service.


Flu strains expected to be prevalent this year include A/Panama, A/New Caledonia, and B/Yamanashi.


CONTACT: Steve Fine, Director
Division of Public Health and Ancillary Services
(314) 615-6445 (Pager: 314-430-2671)

Breast Cancer Screening Is Essential For Early Detection.

Patients at County Health Centers Benefit.

October 4, 2000. Breast cancer is the second major cause of death among women and the most common cause of death in women between the ages of 40 and 55. All women are at risk for developing breast cancer and the risk increases with age. Because the best defense is early detection and treatment, cancer screening is essential for everyone. When found in its early stages, breast cancer is easier to treat and involves less suffering.


Women who are established clients of Saint Louis County Health Centers receive preventive screening. Saint Louis County residents who do not have their own physician or primary health care provider may call for information about appointments for a "Well Woman" check and referral for a screening mammogram. (DOH mammography services are provided through the Missouri Baptist Mobile Unit.) A sliding fee scale is based on the individual's ability to pay. Locations and phone numbers are: John C. Murphy Health Center at 6065 Helen Avenue in Berkeley, (314) 522-6410; Pine Lawn Health Center at 6150 Natural Bridge Road, (314) 389-4700; and South County Health Center at 4580 South Lindbergh, (314) 842-1300.


"Our emphasis is to provide services for women who are underinsured or uninsured," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director. According to Dr. Livingston, if every woman over 50 followed the guidelines for routine screening and mammography, the mortality rate from breast cancer would decrease by an estimated thirty percent.


An estimated 2.6 million American women are now living with breast cancer. Over 70% of breast cancer occurs in women with no known risk factor. Although it's considered a woman's disease, men can also develop breast cancer. This year, approximately 40,800 women and 400 men will die of breast cancer. When breast cancer is confined to the breast, the five-year survival rate is over 95 percent.


Contact: Joan Bialczak, Director, Division of Health Services
(314) 615-6415

Gateway Green Exposition features "green" building products.

October 17 event links vendors of building and landscape materials with potential buyers.

September 22, 2000. Looking for building and landscaping products that are energy efficient or made of recycled content? Come to the Gateway Green Vendor Expo on Tuesday, October 17 (10 a.m. to 7 p.m.) at the St. Louis Science Center. The event will showcase "green" products to a wide range of potential buyers, including homebuilders, remodelers, purchasing agents, facility managers and the general public.


The Saint Louis County Department of Health is taking the lead in sponsoring the event. "The purpose of the Expo is to connect buyers and sellers of products which benefit our environment," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director, Saint Louis County Department of Health. "We encourage businesses to see this as an opportunity to educate buyers about how their products can be both cost-effective and environmentally beneficial."


For additional details or to reserve a booth, businesses should contact Lora Mather at (314) 615-6878. The cost to exhibit is $150 for each 10 ft. by 10 ft. space.


The Expo will feature building products made of recycled content, including roofing materials, flooring materials, exterior walls, and steel studs. Also, playground equipment, landscape materials, utility sheds, and other recycled content or energy efficient products will be on display.


Product demonstrations and educational sessions are scheduled throughout the day. David Hopke, a home builder from Mexico, Missouri, will discuss his experience building affordable, entry-level housing using recycled-content materials that produce less construction waste. An evening reception from 5 p.m. -7 p.m. highlights Mr. Ron W. Jones, organizer of the National Association of Home Builders' Green Building Conference, and Ms. Linda Descano, Director of Social Awareness Investment, Smith-Barney Asset Management, discussing consumer demand for environmentally friendly purchasing and investment alternatives.


There is no charge to attend the event. Attendance prizes donated by the vendors will be awarded throughout the day. Advance registration is preferred; however, you may register at the door. For more information or to register, please contact Amaya Harris, Saint Louis County Department of Health at (314) 615-8958.


Contact: Lora Mather, Market Development Specialist, (314) 615-6878

October is National Adopt-a-Shelter-Dog Month.

September 22, 2000. Saint Louis County Department of Health Animal Shelters are offering free dog toys and various sample products with all dogs and puppies adopted during the month of October, in honor of national Adopt-a-Shelter-Dog month.


A pet can bring many positive rewards, such as unconditional love, reduced stress, and incentive to exercise. Pets are also a responsibility. If you're thinking of getting a pet, ask yourself these important questions. Is a pet right for my household? A strong, active pet may be too much for a young child or elderly person to handle. Small pets may be too delicate for rough play with children. Always make sure that everyone in the household agrees to adopt an animal.


Who will take care of it? One adult in the home should be designated as the primary caretaker so that the pet's needs do not become lost in the shuffle of busy schedules.


Can I afford a pet? The cost of a pet is more than just the purchase price or adoption fee; remember to include the cost of food, pet supplies, veterinarian bills and training.


Am I ready to make a life-long commitment? Adopting a pet means being responsible for its health and happiness for the rest of its life, which could easily be 10 to 15 years for dogs and over 20 years for cats.


Will I commit to basic training for my pet? A well-trained dog is a pleasure and is welcome in public parks, on walks, and as a visitor. Research shows that people who take the time to train their dogs are more likely to keep them longer than people who don't.


Like all pets, dogs need basic care: food, shelter and water, proper vaccinations, veterinary care, and love and attention from their human companions. Included with adoption from Saint Louis County Department of Health animal shelters are rabies vaccinations/registrations, and other immunizations. Spay/neuter operations are required within 30 days. For more information, please call or visit the nearest Saint Louis County Animal Control Shelter:


  • Central/South County: 77 Hunter, 63124 (314) 726-6655
  • North County: 4100 Seven Hills, 63033 (314) 831-6500
Photo Opportunity: Adorable puppies and dogs available for adoption!
Contact: Dan Knox, D.V.M., Manager, Animal Control
Pager: (314) 430-6208

County Health Department Offers Family Mental Health Services To Residents.

September 22, 2000. October is "National Depression and Mental Health Awareness" month, and a good time to consider the importance of our psychological well being.


"Mental disorders are real health conditions that can be successfully treated," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director of Saint Louis County Department of Health. Public health experts stress the importance of treating both mental and physiological disorders.


"Physical and mental health are interrelated - one can affect the other - for better or worse," Dr. Livingston explained. "Most people don't hesitate to get help for physical problems; likewise, they shouldn't be reluctant to seek help for psychological ones."


Saint Louis County Department of Health offers a range of family mental health services. "We provide comprehensive outpatient mental health services for children, adolescents, adults, couples and families who live in Saint Louis County," said Gregg Robinson, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist & Area Manager-Family Mental Health. "Our staff is composed of clinical social workers, psychologists and psychiatrists." All staff members are licensed in their respective disciplines. A sliding fee scale is available and insurance is accepted.


Services include mental health evaluation of children, adolescents and adults, psychological testing/evaluation, and psychiatric services including medication therapy and management. Individual, family and group therapy sessions are available. Parent education and programs for community groups are offered, as well as mental health consultation for schools, agencies and other professionals. And a new program for smoking cessation is being planned.


To schedule an appointment, please contact one of these Saint Louis County Department of Health office locations for Family Mental Health:


North County Center, 21 Village Square, Hazelwood, MO 63042; Phone (314) 615-7471


Central County Center, 111 South Meramec, Clayton, MO 63105; Phone (314) 615-1760


South County Center, Keller Plaza, 4548 Lemay Ferry Rd., St. Louis, MO 63129; Phone (314) 615-4072


West County Center, 78 Clarkson-Wilson Centre, Chesterfield, MO 63017; Phone (314) 615-0950.


For more information, please contact Dr. Gregg Robinson, Clinical Psychologist & Area Manager - Family Mental Health, Saint Louis County Department of Health, at (314) 615-1760. Or, visit the county's web page at https://stlouisco.com/doh and click on "Family Mental Health."


CONTACT: Dr. Gregg Robinson, Clinical Psychologist & Area Manager
Family Mental Health, (314) 615-1760.

County Health Department Reports Rabid Bats in Maryland Heights, Ellisville.

September 14, 2000. Animal Control officers from Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH) picked up two bats - one in Maryland Heights, one in Ellisville - for rabies testing. Results received September 13 showed the bats tested positive for rabies. This brings the total of rabid bats this season to eleven. There were no known contacts or human exposures. Several vaccinated pets were around the bats and these animals have been given rabies boosters.


"This is more than we would expect in an average season in Saint Louis County," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, DOH director. "Normally, we would expect to see three or four," she added. According to Dan Knox, D.V.M., manager of animal control, "It's difficult to say why the number is higher this year. The number of bats being submitted for testing is about the same as in previous years, but more of those tests are coming back positive." Dr. Knox suggests there may be greater public awareness, and more people are calling to report bats that appear to be sick, on the ground, and unable to fly. "Those are the ones that tend to test positive," he said, "because rabies can interfere with the bats' sonar, causing the bat to crash into things and fall to the ground."


Dr. Knox stresses that "people should be aware and cautious of all wildlife, especially bats, and avoid contact with any animal that is behaving strangely." It's important to caution children not to touch any bat, especially if it's on the ground or unable to fly. Pet owners should check with their veterinarians to be sure pet dogs and cats are vaccinated.


Many bats don't carry rabies, and in fact perform a beneficial service by eating large quantities of insects. But if one bat in a colony contracts rabies, the disease may spread to other members of the colony. There is no indication of a local colony of positive bats, as rabid bats have been seen from all over the County geographically this season.


Contact: Mary Metzner, Animal Control Supervisor
(Pager: 314-430-6276


Gateway Green Expo Coming - October 17th.

September 13, 2000. Bringing together purchasers and suppliers to promote buying recycled and environmentally preferable products and services.


For full Expo information, visit our Gateway Green Expo site.



HOT WEATHER HEALTH WARNING.

August 30, 2000. Health officials in the City of St. Louis have upgraded the Hot Weather Health Advisory issued Monday to a Hot Weather Health Warning. Saint Louis County, St. Charles County and Jefferson County will remain under a Hot Weather Health Advisory.


Temperatures typically are higher in St. Louis City than in surrounding areas.


Everyone in the Metropolitan St. Louis area, especially the elderly and others at high risk for heat illness, should take precautions to protect their health.


Check at least daily on elderly neighbors and relatives. High risk individuals should spend at least the hottest part of the day in air conditioned quarters.


During this Hot Weather Health Warning, cooling centers in St. Louis City will offer extended hours. Operation Weather Survival agencies throughout the area will work to ensure that all programs that provide services in the community for relief of heat stress to prevent heat illness are functioning.


For information on a cooling shelter near you or for information about services of Operation Weather Survival member agencies that help individuals during the heat, call the United Way Greater St. Louis Information Referral line at 1-800-427-4626.


For help with a serious heat illness, call 911.


Pets are also affected by extreme heat. Please make sure thatoutdoor pets have access to shade and fresh water at all times, and do not leave pets in closed vehicles.


Contacts:
Ellen Ellick
City of St. Louis
(314) 612-5143
Page: 902-2916
  Steve Fine
Saint Louis County
(314) 615-6445
Pager: 430-2671

Find out about cooling centers or the services of
Operation Weather Survival.


Call Operation Weather Survival at (800) 427-4626 between 8:30 am and 5 pm.



State Health Department announces State-wide
HOT WEATHER HEALTH ADVISORY.

August 29, 2000. Due to the high temperatures and humidity throughout the state, Director of the Missouri Department of Health, Dr. Maureen Dempsey, today issued a statewide Hot Weather Health Advisory. A statewide advisory is issued by the department when a heat index of 105 or greater is first reached in a large proportion of the state. The advisory reminds Missourians of the dangers posed by the high heat and humidity and urges them to take extra precautions to prevent heat-related illness and death. Residents are encouraged to check on their elderly family members and neighbors regularly to be sure they are not suffering from the effects of high temperatures. Do not leave infants and children unattended in hot environments.


Heat indexes across the state were very high yesterday, and weather forecasters are predicting continued high heat indexes today and for the next few days. Yesterday the heat index was 110 in St. Louis, 113 in Kansas City, 106 in Columbia, 100 in Springfield and 107 in Cape Girardeau. "Missourians need to be aware that exposure to high temperatures and humidity can be very dangerous, especially for older Missourians," Dempsey said. "The hot weather health advisory means that weather conditions may cause heat-related illness and death during this time and necessary precautions should be taken."


To date in 2000, there have been 12 confirmed heat-related deaths in Missouri, and 413 heat-related illnesses have been reported. In 1999, 92 Missourians died due to heat-related causes and 968 heat-related illnesses were reported.


The elderly and the chronically ill are more vulnerable to the effects of high temperatures. They perspire less and are more likely to have health problems requiring medications that impair the body's response to heat. In 1999, 92 Missourians died due to heat-related causes; 68 of these were individuals aged 65 or older. During prolonged periods of high temperatures, air conditioning is the best preventive measure. Of the 68 elderly deaths in 1999, 24 had no air conditioning, 19 had an air conditioner but would not use it and 11 had an air conditioner that was not working properly. Most of the elderly were found in homes with fans blowing and windows closed. For some, even encouragement from relatives and friends could not convince them to use their air conditioner. Many did not want to or could not pay the high electric bill associated with air conditioning, while others stated they had made it through other hot summers without air conditioning or that the cold bothered their arthritis. Infants and children up to 4 years of age are sensitive to the effects of high temperatures and rely on others to regulate their environments and provide adequate liquids. Infants and children should never be left unattended in a parked car or other hot environment.


Also at risk are unacclimated adults of any age who work or exercise vigorously outdoors and fail to rest frequently in a cool environment or drink enough fluids. Other risk factors include a history of heat stroke, obesity, infection or fever, diarrhea or dehydration, poor circulation, diabetes, sunburn and drug and alcohol use.


As part of the state's effort to aid in the alert, Dempsey reminded Missourians that the state's toll-free adult abuse hotline can be used to report any elderly persons who may be suffering from the heat and need assistance. The number is 1-800-392-0210. If the hotline call identifies a person who may be in a life-threatening situation, a member of the Division of Aging's network will quickly contact those individuals.


"During the heat wave, we should all make the extra effort to check up on the elderly, the disabled and the home-bound," Dempsey said. "Through the efforts of volunteer agencies, state and local governments and concerned neighbors, we can help prevent heat tragedies."



To Prevent Heat-Related Illness
  • Be aware of the warning signs of heat-related illness, such as light-headedness, mild nausea or confusion, sleepiness or profuse sweating.
  • Increase your fluid intake; drink more liquid than your thirst indicates.
  • Drink non-alcoholic and caffeine-free liquids, such as water and juices.
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.
  • When unaccustomed to working or exercising in a hot environment, start slowly and pick up the pace gradually. Rest frequently in a shady area.
  • Spend time in an air-conditioned place; if not at home, then such public places as libraries, supermarkets, shopping malls and movie theaters.
  • Do not rely on fans as your primary cooling device during a heat wave. (See paragraphs below.)
  • Schedule outdoor activities carefully, preferably before noon or in the evening,
  • When working in the heat, monitor the condition of your co-workers and have someone do the same for you.
  • Monitor those at high risk, such as the elderly, infants and children up to 4 year of age, someone who is overweight or someone on medication.
  • Ask your physician whether you are at particular risk because of medication.
  • Do not leave infants, children or pets unattended in a parked car or other hot environment.

Although fans are less expensive to operate, they may not be effective, and may even be harmful, when temperatures are very high. As the air temperature rises, air flow is increasingly ineffective in cooling the body until finally, at temperatures above about 100° F (the exact number varies with the humidity) increasing air movement actually increases heat stress. More specifically, when the temperature of the air rises to about 100° F, the fan may be delivering overheated air to the skin at a rate that exceeds the capacity of the body to get rid of this heat, even with sweating, and the net effect is to add heat rather than to cool the body. An air conditioner, if one is available, or seeking shelter in an air-conditioned building is a much better alternative.


More information on heat-related illness is available through
the Missouri Department of Health Home Page at
http://www.health.state.mo.us/ColdAndHeat/CandH.html.
CONTACT: Diane C. Rackers, Health Program Representative
573-751-6128

Read hot weather health tips.
Find out about cooling centers or the services of
Operation Weather Survival.

Call Operation Weather Survival at (800) 427-4626 between 8:30 am and 5 pm.

Proposed Asbestos Regulation information and hearing.

August 29, 2000. Air Pollution Control announces proposed Asbestos Regulation Public Hearing, to be held October 12, 2000, from 12:30 pm to 2 pm in Conference Room 1012/1013 in the World Trade Center, 121 S. Meramec, Clayton, MO.


The proposed regulation may be reviewed here. It requires the Acrobat PDF Viewer.



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING - Waste processing facility.

August 25, 2000. Route 66 Landscape Supply Center, Incorporated, has submitted a license application to the Director of the Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH) for construction and operation of a waste processing facility. The 10-acre site is located at 18900 Franklin Road in an unincorporated portion of Saint Louis County. The general legal description is as follows: U.S. Survey 3064, Township 43 North, Range 3 East, in Saint Louis County, Missouri.


The Department of Health will hold a public availability session and a public hearing on September 21, 2000, in the Eureka City Hall, located at 100 City Hall Drive, Eureka, MO. The public availability session, which will occur from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., will provide an opportunity for members of the public to talk informally with representatives from the Department of Health.


A formal public hearing will commence at 7:30 p.m., after the availability session. At the hearing, members of the public may comment on the license request and have their comments entered into the official record. Questions will not be answered during the hearing portion of this meeting.


Citizens may schedule an appointment to view the plans at the Saint Louis County Government Center's South County office, located at 4562 Lemay Ferry Road, by calling (314) 615-4130. In addition, DOH will accept written comments on the proposed waste facility until 5:00 p.m., September 29, 2000. Please send comments to the Saint Louis County Department of Health, Waste Management Branch, 4562 Lemay Ferry Road, Saint Louis, Missouri 63129. For more information about the proposed facility, please contact Mr. Brad Bomanz, Waste Management Specialist, at (314) 615-4032.


Contact: Mr. Brad Bomanz, Waste Management Specialist III
(314) 615-4032

Responsible Owners Pick Up After Pets

August 18, 2000. The Animal Control Office of Saint Louis County Department of Health reminds pet owners to pick up after pets. It's courteous, it's the law, and it's good for public health. (The so-called "pooper scooper" law has been on the books since 1985.)


"During the warm summer months, we tend to get more complaints about people walking their dogs and leaving unwelcome reminders in their neighbor's yards," said Dan Knox, DVM, Manager, Animal Control. "This isn't the most pleasant thing to come across when you are out working in the garden or mowing the lawn."


In addition, Dr. Knox says, there is a potential health risk. Various diseases may be spread through pet feces. Children who play outdoors and come into contact with the soil are especially vulnerable to possible exposure.


Toxocariasis is a common pet related (zoonotic) disease. T canis eggs expelled in dog feces can contaminate the soil and remain there for a period of time. Dog and cat droppings can contain parasites such as roundworms, tapeworms, hookworms and spirochetes as well as bacteria that can cause infections.


Prevention includes good hygiene and close supervision of children playing in parks and yard areas. It's important for owners to provide regular veterinary care for their pets, and when walking the dog, owners should carry a plastic bag or newspaper sleeve to pick up droppings.


For more information on responsible pet ownership, please call Saint Louis County Animal Control at (314) 726-6655 (south shelter) or (314) 831-6500 (north shelter).


Contact: Dan Knox, DVM, Manager, Animal Control
(314) 727-7017
Pager: 430-6208

County Health Department Reports Sixth and Seventh Rabid Bats Of Season.
Rabid bats are found in Webster Groves, Shrewsbury.

July 25, 2000. On Saturday July 22, Animal Control officers from Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH) picked up two bats for rabies testing. One was in Webster Groves, the other in Shrewsbury. Results received July 24 showed the bats tested positive for rabies. There were no known contacts or exposures.


"This is more than we would expect in an average season in Saint Louis County," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, DOH director. "Normally, we would expect to see three for the entire season, running from spring through fall," she added.


Dan Knox, D.V.M., manager of animal control, stresses that "people should be aware and cautious of all wildlife, especially bats, and avoid contact with any animal that is behaving strangely." Dr. Knox advised pet owners to check with their veterinarians on the immunization status of their pets.


It's important to caution children not to touch any bat, especially if it's on the ground or unable to fly. Dr. Knox explains that the disease of rabies can interfere with the bats' sonar, causing the bat to crash into things and fall to the ground.


Most bats don't carry rabies, and in fact perform a beneficial service by eating large quantities of insects. But if one bat in a colony contracts rabies, the disease may spread to other members of the colony. This is why we must be careful to have our pets vaccinated, and warn kids not to touch any unknown animals.


Contact: Dan Knox, D.V.M., Manager, Animal Control
Pager: 314-430-6208

County Health Department Reports Fifth Rabid Bat Of Season.
Shrewsbury resident undergoes series of rabies shots.

July 17, 2000. On Saturday July 8, a Shrewsbury resident found a live bat inside her home. Animal Control officers from Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH) picked up the bat and sent it for testing. Results received on July 12 showed the bat tested positive for rabies.


The resident, concerned about possibly having been bitten by the bat, consulted with health officials, and opted to undergo a series of post-exposure rabies shots. There are no pets or children in the household.


"This is the fifth rabid bat of the season in Saint Louis County," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, DOH director. "People should be aware and cautious of all wildlife, especially bats, and avoid contact with any animal that is behaving strangely," she advised.


Animal control officers have been in the south county neighborhood alerting residents to be cautious, and reminding them to have pets vaccinated. Dan Knox, D.V.M., manager of animal control, stresses that "people should check with their veterinarians on the immunization status of their pets. And it's important to caution children not to touch any bat, especially if it's on the ground or unable to fly." Dr. Knox explains that the disease of rabies can interfere with the bats' sonar, causing the bat to crash into things and fall to the ground.


Most bats don't carry rabies, and in fact perform a beneficial service by eating large quantities of insects. But if one bat in a colony contracts rabies, the disease may spread to other members of the colony. This is why we must be careful to have our pets vaccinated, and warn kids not to touch any unknown animals.


Contact: Dan Knox, D.V.M., Manager, Animal Control
Pager: 314-430-6208

Information Available on Hepatitis A Requirement.

July 17, 2000. A new brochure is available from Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH), outlining the hepatitis A vaccination requirements for food handlers. Restaurant owners and operators who would like to obtain a copy of the brochure may call the nearest DOH satellite center: Central (314) 615-8900; North (314) 615-7469; South (314) 615-4027; or West (314) 615-0929.


Health inspectors began enforcing the new law in Saint Louis County July 1. The law requires vaccination against hepatitis A for persons who prepare, handle or touch any food (except uncut produce), utensils or serving items intended for individual consumption. It applies to all food handlers, including those in restaurants, day care centers, hospitals, schools, nursing homes, and catering operations. Employers must keep records to show that their employees are in compliance.


The Saint Louis County Council passed the law on December 16, 1999. On June 8, the council approved a revision extending the grace period to thirty days for new hires to get the first shot.


Hepatitis A is a viral infection of the liver, which can be spread by consuming food or drink that has been handled by an infected individual. Health officials stress that careful hand washing after using the toilet or changing diapers is still very important to prevent the spread of disease, even after being vaccinated.


CONTACT: Barry Drucker, Program Manager, Public Health Sanitation (314) 615-8900

Heat Warning for County, region.

July 7, 2000 (From the Post-Dispatch). Area health departments on Thursday warned people to beware of extreme heat for the next few days and take preacautions.


The health departments of St. Louis City and County and of Jefferson and St. Charles counties jointly issued a hot-weather health warning after the National Weather Service warned that the heat index is expected to hit 105 degrees today and go as high as 110 degrees on Saturday and Sunday.


The heat index takes both temperature andhumidity into accounty. The weather service expects actual temperatures to stay in the mid-90s today, Saturday and Sunday.


Health officials are concerned that the hot weather could lead to a repeat of last year's 53 heat-related deaths recorded in the region, 38 of those in the city.


Read hot weather health tips. Find out about cooling centers or the services of Operation Weather Survival. Call Operation Weather Survival at 800-427-4626 between 8:30 am and 5 pm.
"Safety Town" event at Pine Lawn Health Center offers children free bicycle helmets, car seats.

July 6, 2000. Saint Louis County Department of Health and Saint Louis County Police Department are sponsoring a "SAFETY TOWN" on Tuesday, July 18, from 11 A.M. to 3 P.M. at the Pine Lawn Health Center, 6150 Natural Bridge Road.


"Studies show that wearing a safety helmet can dramatically reduce head injuries," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director. "In keeping with our mission of prevention, a mock city will be set up to teach children first-hand the rules of the road for safe bicycling, rollerblading and skateboarding." Children's bicycle helmets and infant car seats will be available free, while supplies last, Dr. Livingston added.


Health department staff, along with officers from the Saint Louis County Police Department, will properly fit each helmet for the child's safety. Children who already own helmets may bring their bikes and helmets to be checked for appropriate fit.


There will be demonstrations throughout the day on the installation and placement of car seats. Parents can drive through and have their car seat checked for safety.


The event is free to County residents. For more information please call (314) 522-6410 x 6223.


Photo Opportunity:


  • Children learning the rules of the road in a mock city complete with traffic signals.
  • Kids getting their safety helmets fitted, and their bikes checked for safety.
  • Parents having car safety seats checked for proper installation.

CONTACT: Officer Lester Darris, (314) 389-4700
Andrea Johnson, Manager (314) 389-4700


 
Keep Pets Safe from Fireworks.

June 28, 2000. Over the July 4 holiday, the animal control office of Saint Louis County Department of Health issues this reminder.


"We experience an increase in calls for animals around the 4th because of the fireworks," said Dan Knox, DVM, Manager, Animal Control. "We would like pet owners to be aware of the potential dangers for a pet and the community. Animals that normally do not leave the yard will do anything to get away from fireworks and the noise they create."


Here are some tips to help keep pets - and people - safer:


  • Consider asking your veterinarian to prescribe a tranquilizer for your pet.
  • Keep pets in a safe area inside the house, preferably the basement, with the radio playing soothing music.
  • Try not to leave the pet for extended periods of time.
  • Keep identification on pet, in the event that the animal does escape in fear.

Animals bite because they are frightened or injured. Animals that run during this time of the year are usually very frightened and confused, and they can pose a serious public health threat.


For more information on responsible pet ownership,
please call (314) 726-6655.


Contact: Dan Knox, DVM, Manager, Animal Control
(314) 727-7017  Pager: 430-6208

"Safety Town" event at County Health Center offers children free bicycle helmets, car seats.

June 26, 2000. Saint Louis County Department of Health and Saint Louis County Police Department are sponsoring a "SAFETY TOWN" on Wednesday, July 12, from 10:00 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. at the South County Health Center located at 4580 South Lindbergh (just south of Gravois) in Sunset Hills.


"Studies show that wearing a safety helmet can dramatically reduce head injuries," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director. "In keeping with our mission of prevention, a mock city will be set up to teach children first-hand the rules of the road for safe bicycling, rollerblading and skateboarding." Children's bicycle helmets and infant car seats will be available free, while supplies last, Dr. Livingston added.


Health department staff, along with officers from the Saint Louis County Police Department, will properly fit each helmet for the child's safety. Children who already own helmets may bring their bikes and helmets to be checked for appropriate fit.


There will be demonstrations throughout the day on the installation and placement of car seats. Parents can drive through and have their car seat checked for safety.


The event is free to County residents. A future "Safety Town" is scheduled for July 18 at the Pine Lawn Health Center. For more information please call (314) 522-6410 x 6223.


Photo Opportunity:


  • Children learning the rules of the road in a mock city complete with traffic signals.
  • Kids getting their safety helmets fitted, and their bikes checked for safety.
  • Parents having car safety seats checked for proper installation.

CONTACT: Officer Kenny Ziegler, (314) 842-1300 x 7601
Diane McKenna, (314) 842-1300 x 7201



Countdown: Health inspectors will begin enforcing Hepatitis A requirement next month.

June 19, 2000. If you are a food handler working in Saint Louis County, you have until July 1 to be vaccinated for hepatitis A. That's when health inspectors will begin enforcing the new law in Saint Louis County.


Two shots are needed: an initial vaccination, and a booster within six to twelve months of the initial vaccination. To get the shots, individuals may go to their own doctors or health care providers; to County health centers (South County Health Center, 314-842-1300; John C. Murphy Health Center, 314-522-6410); or other community organizations, including the following: SSM Corporate Services (314-535-8694), BarnesCare (314-331-0602), VNA (314-918-7171), Concentra Medical Centers (314-434-8174), and Unity Corporate Health (314-506-6090). The cost is $25 per shot for age nineteen and over, or $18 per shot for up to age nineteen.


The law requires vaccination against hepatitis A for persons who prepare, handle or touch any food (except uncut produce), utensils or serving items intended for individual consumption. The law applies to all food handlers, including those in restaurants, day care centers, hospitals, schools, nursing homes, and catering operations. Employers must keep records to show that their employees are in compliance. The Saint Louis County Council passed the law on December 16, 1999. On June 8, the council approved a revision extending the grace period to thirty days for new hires to get the first shot.


 


Hepatitis A is a viral infection of the liver, which can be spread by consuming food or drink that has been handled by an infected individual. Health officials stress that careful hand washing after using the toilet or changing diapers is still very important to prevent the spread of disease, even after being vaccinated. For more information, please call the Saint Louis County Department of Health at (314) 615-8900.


CONTACT: Barry Drucker, Program Manager, Public Health Sanitation
(314) 615-8900



"Safety Town" event at County Health Center offers children free bicycle helmets, car seats.

June 19, 2000. Saint Louis County Department of Health and Saint Louis County Police Department are sponsoring a "SAFETY TOWN" on Tuesday, June 27, from 10:00 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. at the John C. Murphy Health Center located at 6065 Helen Avenue in Berkeley.


"Studies show that wearing a safety helmet can dramatically reduce head injuries," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director. "In keeping with our mission of prevention, a mock city will be set up to teach children first-hand the rules of the road for safe bicycling, rollerblading and skateboarding." Children's bicycle helmets and infant car seats will be available free, while supplies last, Dr. Livingston added.


Health department staff, along with officers from the Saint Louis County Police Department, will properly fit each helmet for the child's safety. Children who already own helmets may bring their bikes and helmets to be checked for appropriate fit.


There will be demonstrations throughout the day on the installation and placement of car seats. Parents can drive through and have their car seat checked for safety.


The event is free to County residents. Future "Safety Towns" are scheduled for July 12 at South County Health Center and July 18 at the Pine Lawn Health Center. For more information please call (314) 522-6410 x 6223.


Photo Opportunity:


  • Children learning the rules of the road in a mock city complete with traffic signals.
  • Kids getting their safety helmets fitted, and their bikes checked for safety.
  • Parents having car safety seats checked for proper installation.

CONTACT: Officer Chuck Zammit, (314) 522-6410 x 6223
Betsy Alexander, (314) 522-6410 x 6076



County Health Department Reports Second Rabid Bat Of Season.

June 7, 2000. A resident of the 1100 block of Jonesborough in Chesterfield called the Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH) after finding a bat in his garage Saturday June 3. Animal control officers picked it up alive. It was euthanized and sent for testing. Results received Monday, June 05, 2000 show the bat tested positive for rabies. The resident has two children and three properly vaccinated pets. There were no known direct exposures to the bat. Rabies boosters for pets are recommended as a routine precaution.


"This is the second rabid bat of the season in Saint Louis County," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, DOH director. "In this case our animal control staff advised the resident on appropriate precautions in case there are other bats near his residence. If one bat in a colony contracts rabies, chances are it will spread to other members of the colony. This is why we must be careful to have our pets vaccinated, and warn children not to touch any unknown animals."


Dan Knox, D.V.M., manager of animal control, stresses that "people should check with their veterinarians on the immunization status of their pets. And its important to caution children not to touch any bat, especially if it's on the ground or unable to fly." Dr. Knox explains that the disease of rabies can interfere with a bat's sonar, causing it to crash into things and fall to the ground. Most bats don't carry rabies, and in fact perform a beneficial service by eating large quantities of insects. However, people should be aware and cautious of all wildlife, especially bats, and avoid contact with any animal that is behaving strangely.


To reach the nearest Saint Louis County Animal Control office,
call (314) 726-6655 for Central and South County;
call (314) 831-6500 for North County.


Contact: Dan Knox, D.V.M., Manager, Animal Control
Pager: (314) 430-6208



June is National Adopt-a-Shelter-Cat Month.
Adopt a Cat or Kitten from a County Shelter Now
and Get Free Catnip and Cat Toys

June 6, 2000. Saint Louis County Department of Health Animal Shelters are offering free catnip, cat toys and various sample products with all cats and kittens adopted during the month of June, in honor of national Adopt-a-Shelter-Cat month.


Cats are the ideal pets for busy people. Cats are fairly low maintenance pets (compared to dogs) as they can be litter box trained and don't need to be taken for walks outdoors. Cats are content to stay indoors; in fact, indoor cats live longer and healthier lives than those that spend time outdoors. Cats can take care of themselves while owners are at work or school. Many households adopt two kittens to keep each other company while owners are away.


Like all pets, cats need basic care: food, shelter and water, proper vaccinations, veterinary care, and love and attention from their human companions. Included with adoption from Saint Louis County Department of Health animal shelters are rabies vaccinations/registrations, and other immunizations. Spay/neuter operations are required within 30 days. For more information, please call or visit the nearest Saint Louis County Animal Control Shelter:


  • Central/South County: 77 Hunter, 63124 (314) 726-6655
  • North County: 4100 Seven Hills, 63033 (314) 831-6500

Photo Opportunity: Adorable kittens and cats available for adoption!

Visit our Animal Adoption site.
Visit other area pet adoption sites.
Contact: Dan Knox, D.V.M., Manager, Animal Control
Pager: (314) 430-6208



County Health Department Reports First Rabid Bat Of Season.

May 25, 2000. A resident on Hampton Park in Richmond Heights called the Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH) after finding a bat that was unable to fly. Results received on May 25 showed the bat tested positive for rabies. The resident had two pets, which were properly vaccinated for rabies. Both pets received rabies boosters as a precaution. There were no known direct exposures.


"This is the first rabid bat of the season in Saint Louis County," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, DOH director. "With warm weather, and the upcoming holiday, people may be spending more time outdoors. They should be aware and cautious of all wildlife, especially bats, and avoid contact with any animal that is behaving strangely," she advised.


Dan Knox, D.V.M., manager of animal control, stresses that "people should check with their veterinarians on the immunization status of their pets. And it's important to caution children not to touch any bat, especially if it's on the ground or unable to fly." Dr. Knox explains that the disease of rabies can interfere with the bats' sonar, causing the bat to crash into things and fall to the ground.


Most bats don't carry rabies, and in fact perform a beneficial service by eating large quantities of insects. But if one bat in a colony contracts rabies, chances are it will spread to other members of the colony. This is why we must be careful to have our pets vaccinated, and warn kids not to touch any unknown animals.


Contact: Dan Knox, D.V.M., Manager, Animal Control
Pager: 314-430-6208



Hepatitis A Ordinance Brochure.

May 16, 2000. An ordinance that was passed by the Saint Louis County Council on December 16, 1999, requiring food handlers to be vaccinated against hepatitis A, goes into effect July 1, 2000. The Saint Louis County Department of Health is mailing a brochure this week to all licensed foodservice establishments to remind them of the new requirement.


The law requires vaccination against hepatitis A for persons who prepare, handle or touch any food (except uncut produce) intended for individual consumption. The law applies to all food handlers, including those in restaurants, day care centers, hospitals, schools, nursing homes, and catering operations. Employers must keep records to show the health inspectors that their employees are in compliance.


Two shots are needed: an initial vaccination, and a booster within six to twelve months. Individuals may go to their own doctors or health care providers; to county health centers (South County Health Center, 314-842-1300; John C. Murphy Health Center, 314-522-6410) or other community organizations including the following: SSM Corporate Services (314-768-5371), BarnesCare (314-331-0602), VNA (314-918-7171), and Unity Corporate Health (314-364-3000). Cost is $25 per shot for age 19 and over; $18 per shot for up to age 19.


Hepatitis A is a viral infection of the liver, which can be spread by consuming food or drink that has been handled by an infected individual. Health officials stress that careful hand washing after using the toilet or changing diapers is very important to prevent the spread of disease, even after being vaccinated. For more information, please call the Saint Louis County Department of Health at (314) 615-8900.


Contact: Barry Drucker, Program Manager
Public Health Sanitation
(314) 615-8900
View Hepatitis A Ordinance



Saint Louis County Department of Health Salutes Nurses!

May 12, 2000. This week is National Nurses Week, marked by the birthday on May 12 of Florence Nightingale, founder of nursing as a modern profession.


During this week the Saint Louis County Department of Health recognizes the efforts of its ambulatory care, corrections medicine, home health, communicable disease control, and public health nurses who all work to preserve and improve the health and quality of life of people within Saint Louis County.


Nurses provide direct nursing care and patient education in each of the three County Family Health Centers located in Berkeley (phone 314-522-6410), Pine Lawn (314-389-4700) and South County (314-842-1300) and in corrections medicine at the justice center. The communicable disease control nurses provide a resource to the community on childhood, adult and travel immunizations, as well as investigation of communicable diseases (314-615-1630). Home health nurses (314-615-1744) provide direct nursing care and homemaker chores to county residents. Public health nurses provide a vital link between the community, its residents and public health. To find out more about public health nursing in your community, please contact the Saint Louis County Department of Health Program at 314-842-1300, extension 7213.


Contact: Jane Hutchinson, Public Health Nurse Manager
(314) 842-1300 ext. 7000



Saint Louis County Department Of Health Observes
Mental Health Month in May.

April 24, 2000. "May is Mental Health Month, and Saint Louis County Department of Health offers a number of mental health services at various County locations," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director.


"Our Family Mental Health program provides comprehensive outpatient mental health services for children, adolescents, adults, couples and families who reside in Saint Louis County," Dr. Livingston said.


The staff is composed of clinical social workers, psychologists and psychiatrists. All staff members are licensed in their respective disciplines. A sliding fee scale is available and insurance is accepted.


To schedule an appointment, please contact one of the following Saint Louis County Department of Health office locations for Family Mental Health:


  • North County Center, 21 Village Square
    Hazelwood, MO 63042
    Phone: (314) 615-7471.
  • Central County Center, 111 South Meramec
    Clayton, MO 63105
    Phone: (314) 615-1760
  • South County Center, Keller Plaza , 4548 Lemay Ferry Rd.
    St. Louis, MO 63129
    Phone: (314) 615-4072
  • West County Center, 78 Clarkson-Wilson Centre
    Chesterfield, MO 63017
    Phone: (314) 615-0950
For more information, please contact
Dr. Gregg Robinson at (314) 615-1760.

Saint Louis County Department of Health Supports Childhood Immunization Week, April 16-22.

April 19, 2000 - Immunization is one of the most effective ways of preventing disease, but some childhood illnesses that could be prevented by immunization are still with us. Approximately 3.5 million cases of varicella (chickenpox) occur each year


Children need 80 percent of their vaccinations in the first two years of life. According to Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director, approximately 94 percent of children who receive their vaccinations through DOH are up to date on their childhood immunizations by their second birthday.


General guidelines for immunization in the first two years of life are as follows:


Diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis (DTP): Four vaccinations - at 2, 4, 6, and 15 to 18 months.


Polio: Three vaccinations - at 2, 4, and 6 to 18 months.


Measles/mumps/rubella (MMR): One vaccination - at 12 to 15 months.


Chickenpox: One vaccination - at 12 to 18 months.


Hepatitis B: Three vaccination - at 0 to 2 months, 1 to 4 months, and 6 to 18 months.


H. influenzae type b (Hib): Three or four vaccinations at 2, 4, 6, and 12 to 15 months.


Saint Louis County Department of Health provides childhood immunizations at no cost to County residents at the DOH health centers. For more information please call Saint Louis County Department of Health at (314) 615-1630.


Contact: Steve Fine, Director
Division of Public Health and Ancillary Services
(314) 615-6445

Upcoming Collection Events Will Let Residents Drop Off Household Hazardous Chemicals.

April 4, 2000. Spring-cleaning may be a little easier for residents, as Saint Louis County Department of Health is hosting several one-day events for household chemical drop-off. Improper disposal of leftover household chemicals can be especially harmful to the environment and public health. This program provides residents with a safe alternative to properly manage these potentially hazardous products. All Saint Louis County residents are welcome, and it's free! The costs are covered by Saint Louis County landfill surcharge funds. Proof of residency, such as a driver's license or tax bill, will be required.


Recyclable materials that will be accepted include latex and oil-based paint, gasoline, fuels, solvents, antifreeze, motor oil and lead acid batteries. Other household chemicals, pesticides, explosives, tires, bulky items, or general household trash will not be accepted. Business and commercial materials are also prohibited.


 


Recyclable Household Chemical Drop-off Events 9 AM - 3 PM / Rain or Shine

 


April 15 St. Louis Community College - Flo Valley
(on Pershall Rd. near I-270 & W. Florissant exit)

May 13 Boeing Company
(on Airport Rd. near I-170 & Airport Rd. exit)

May 20 South County Center Shopping Mall
(on Lemay Ferry Rd. near S. Lindbergh & Lemay Ferry)

June 3 University City Heman Park - Midland/Purdue Parking Lot
(1 Block South of Midland and Olive Street Blvd.)

Additional events will be scheduled later this spring. For more information on these events or other activities, please call the Saint Louis County Department of Health Recycling Hotline at (314) 286-9200, or visit our web site at www.stlouisco.com/doh/ for details.



Local Effort Aims to Teach Children Best Way to Prevent Spread of Illness.

April 3, 2000. Every child should know it. You should wash your hands many times throughout the day. Hand washing is the number one way to control the spread of disease. Yet too many children and adults simply don't take the time to protect themselves from illness by washing their hands.


That's why the YWCA Head Start Program, the Missouri Public Health Association, and the health educators and public health nurses of the Saint Louis County Department of Health are teaming up, along with the Colgate Palmolive Company, to teach children the importance of hand washing and how to wash their hands the right way.


"The results are clear. Good hand washing keeps children healthier," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director of the Saint Louis County Health Department. Dr. Livingston added that a hand washing program designed for children (and later studied) found that there were 25 percent fewer visits to physicians, 22 percent less absenteeism and 86 percent fewer medications taken than the previous year.


Public health professionals across the state are visiting local Head Start sites during Public Health Week, April 3-9, to give the children a program about hand washing, and to give them a chance to try washing their hands effectively. The Colgate Palmolive Company is providing samples of SoftSoap for each child to take home and use.


Contact: Mary Kay Wolf, School Nurse Liaison
Saint Louis County Department of Health, (314) 615-8338
Julie Schlepp, Health Services Coordinator
YWCA Head Start Program, (314) 427-4940

Saint Louis County Department of Health Highlights Impact of Public Health on Citizens' Lives.

April 3, 2000. The Saint Louis County Department of Health is reminding area citizens that public health has an impact on their everyday lives. The occasion for the reminder is Public Health Week in Missouri, which is April 3-9. Buzz Westfall, Saint Louis County Executive, recently issued a proclamation declaring Public Health Week in Saint Louis County.


"While most people don't think about it, local public health services have an impact on almost everything we do in a day," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director of the Saint Louis County Department of Health. "From giving immunizations for your children, to inspecting your favorite restaurant for sanitation, and providing you with a copy of your birth certificate, public health touches all aspects of your health and safety."


The Missouri Public Health Association and the Saint Louis County Department of Health also are working with the YWCA St. Louis County Head Start Program to teach children the importance of hand washing to prevent the spread of disease. Public health nurses and health educators from the health department will coach the children on proper hand washing techniques. The Colgate Palmolive Company is also joining in that effort.


Contact: Ellen Waters, Director, Media Coordinator
Saint Louis County Department of Health

Saint Louis County Department Of Health Provides Daily Pollen Counts For Metropolitan Area

March 23, 2000. Saint Louis County Department of Health is once again reporting the daily pollen and mold counts, said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director. "Our Environmental Health Laboratories measure and record airborne pollen and mold levels throughout the year," Dr. Livingston explained, "and in the spring we naturally see greater concentrations of pollen."


"People who want to reduce their exposure to aero-allergens may find it useful to monitor pollen levels every day," said Dr. Livingston. "Individuals who are particularly sensitive to aero-allergens may find it helpful to avoid outdoor activities when levels are high," she added.


To find out what's in the air today that might be making you sneeze, call the Saint Louis County Department of Health Pollen Information Line at (314) 615-6825 for a recorded announcement (updated by 11:00 each weekday morning). For a free brochure please call at (314) 615-8324.


If mold counts seem unusually high this season, Dr. Livingston points out, it may be due to a more efficient collection device. In January the rotorod sampler that had been in use since 1985 was replaced with a slit-type volumetric spore trap. This change in sampling procedure may result in a higher count of mold spores. Although pollen grains will be comparable, counts for mold spores will typically reflect three to ten times the number of those reported in the past.


Saint Louis County Department of Health collects air samples, magnifies them hundreds of times, performs the pollen counts and reports the data to local news and weather casters, as well as other health organizations such as the American Lung Association. The daily pollen and mold counts apply to the entire St. Louis metropolitan area.


Photo Opportunity: See laboratory analysts count microscopic samples of pollen.


CONTACT: Dr. Robert Nicolotti, Director, Environmental Health Laboratories (314) 615-8324



Upcoming Collection Events for Recyclable Household Chemicals

March 16, 2000. Spring-cleaning may be a little easier for residents, as Saint Louis County Department of Health is hosting several one-day events for household chemical drop-off. Improper disposal of leftover household chemicals can be especially harmful to the environment and public health. This program provides residents with a safe alternative to properly manage these potentially hazardous products. All Saint Louis County residents are welcome, and it's free! The costs are covered by Saint Louis County landfill surcharge funds. Proof of residency, such as a driver's license or tax bill, will be required.


Recyclable materials that will be accepted include latex and oil-based paint, gasoline, fuels, solvents, antifreeze, motor oil and lead acid batteries. Other household chemicals, pesticides, explosives, tires, bulky items, or general household trash will not be accepted. Business and commercial materials are also prohibited.


Recyclable Household Chemical Drop-off Events
9 AM - 3 PM / Rain or Shine


April 15, St. Louis Community College - Flo Valley
  (on Pershall Rd. near I-270 & W. Florissant exit)


May 13, Boeing Company
  (on Airport Rd. near I-170 & Airport Rd. exit)


May 20, South County Shopping Mall
  (on Lemay Ferry Rd. near S. Lindbergh & Lemay Ferry)


For more information on these events or other activities, please call the Saint Louis County Department of Health Recycling Hotline at (314) 286-9200, or visit our web site at www.stlouisco.com/doh/ for details.



Saint Louis County Outlines Dental Services Available to Residents

January 31, 2000. The mouth is a barometer of the entire body, reflecting the effects of stress, nutrition, reactions to medications, and other conditions. "It all shows up in the dentition," according to Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director, Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH).


"We recognize the importance of dental health," Dr. Livingston said, "and we offer a full range of dental services at the three DOH health centers." Patients include adults and children above age three. Dental services are also offered as part of the department's Corrections Medicine.


General dentistry services provided by DOH include exams, x-rays, cleaning, fillings, extractions, fluoride treatments, sealants, preventive periodontal work, and some root canals. Specialty services, such as orthodontics, oral surgery, dentures, partials, crowns or bridges are not provided.


Each DOH dental patient receives an individual treatment plan. Patients are instructed in the newest techniques of brushing (use a soft bristle brush) and flossing (just as important as brushing - maybe even more important!). Dietary advice and help for special problems are routinely given. For example, a patient who is undergoing radiation treatment for other problems may receive a prescription to help prevent cold sores.


DOH health centers are located in South County (842-1300), North County (522-6410), and Pine Lawn (389-6027), with weekday hours. Saint Louis County residents may call a location near them to inquire about eligibility requirements and sliding fee scales based on income and ability to pay.


Contact: Joan Bialczak, Director, Division of Health Services
Saint Louis County Department of Health

Residents Recycle Leftover Fuels and Paints at Collection Event

January 18, 1999. Autumn cleaning was made easier for residents in southwest Saint Louis County with a household chemical drop-off event sponsored by Saint Louis County Department of Health and DaimlerChrysler Assembly Complex. On Saturday, November 6, approximately 320 households of unincorporated Saint Louis County residents recycled more than 21,000 pounds of household items that are often difficult to manage properly.


"Improper disposal of leftover household chemicals can be especially harmful to the environment and public health," said Dr. Paula Livingston, Director of the Saint Louis County Department of Health. "This event gave residents an opportunity to recycle these materials at no expense to them." Costs for the event were covered by Saint Louis County landfill surcharge funds.


Nearly 100% of the collected materials, including paint, automotive products and household solvents, were processed for recycling or energy recovery. For example, collected latex paint will be blended into new recycled paint for distribution. The goal in recovering these household chemicals is to keep them from becoming part of the waste stream and to encourage residents to safely manage these potentially hazardous products.


"The Department of Health's Waste Management Branch encourages residents to recycle whenever possible," said Laura Yates, Program Coordinator. "But the best and easiest way to manage leftovers is to avoid having excess materials in the first place. We encourage residents to buy only what they need and use products up entirely."


For more information on this event or other activities hosted by the Saint Louis County Department of Health, please call the Recycling Hotline at 286-9200.


Contacts:
Laura Yates, 615-8959, Saint Louis County Department of Health
Suzanne Holroyd, 991-4641, The Vandiver Group

WIC Scores Big on Customer Satisfaction

January 18, 2000. Across the nation, the WIC (Women, Infants & Children) program scored at the top in customer satisfaction, second only to Head Start. WIC - the nation's premier public health nutrition program - serves approximately one out of every two infants born in the U.S., and their mothers.


WIC provides nutritious supplemental foods and health care, including individualized nutrition education and counseling, critical referrals to other health care and public assistance programs, breast-feeding education and support - for nearly 7.4 million at-risk, pregnant women, new mothers, infants and children to age five.


"WIC customer satisfaction levels compare favorably with those of L.L. Bean, Mercedes and Nordstrom's," said Douglas A. Greenaway, Executive Director of the National Association of WIC Directors (NAWD).


"Our local WIC clinic staff deserve the credit for delivering top-notch nutrition services to our WIC families," said Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director of Saint Louis County Department of Health. "With WIC programs scoring so high on the customer satisfaction survey, we know that WIC mothers, infants and children are getting a healthy start," said Dr. Livingston.


In this first government-wide customer satisfaction survey, thirty high-impact government programs were evaluated. The survey used the American Customer Satisfaction Index, developed by the University of Michigan Business School and used by more than 200 U.S. private companies to measure the quality of their goods and services.


Survey results were released last month (December 1999) by Vice President Al Gore and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman. WIC received a customer satisfaction index rating of 83, ten points higher than the national average. Participants rated the clarity of WIC's eligibility process at 87, timeliness and adequacy of food benefits at 85, and the usefulness of information at 83. Any score over 80 is considered high. To find out more about WIC services in Saint Louis County please call the Department of Health at 615-0685.


Photo/Interview Opportunity: to interview a local WIC staff member or program participant, please call Ruth Klover at 615-8370.


Contact: Ruth Klover, Program Manager, Nutrition/WIC Services, 615-8370
Steve Fine, Director, Division of Public Health & Ancillary Services, 615-6445

Saint Louis County Will Open New Health Center In North County

January 13, 2000. The Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH) will unveil plans for the new North Central Community Health Center. Residents of the community and members of the press are invited to attend.


What: First look at the site and design


When: Friday, January 21, 2000, at 3:00 PM


Where: Jennings Station Road and Joliet Avenue, in Pine Lawn


Who: Officials from DOH and the City of Pine Lawn


After the unveiling ceremony there will be a reception at the DOH Health Center, located at 6150 Natural Bridge in Pine Lawn.


Contact: Ross Soper, Project Coordinator, 615-8318

January 26 is School Nurses Day

January 12, 2000. School Nurses Day is January 26, and Saint Louis County Department of Health (DOH) salutes school nurses for their dedication to the health needs of school children in Saint Louis County.


"A healthy child is a better learner," said Dr. Paula S. Livingston, DDS, MPH, Director of DOH. "In addition," she observed, "school nurses share many of our public health goals. We especially appreciate their efforts in the area of health education, and we value their partnership in disease prevention."


Dr. Livingston noted that school nurses often link students and their families with public and private health care providers. Their important work, she said, helps to promote optimal health in the schools and the community.