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Department of Health Newsroom 1997



October 28, 1997: St. Louis County Department of Health Offers Car Seat Safety Check
October 8, 1997: Department of Health Recommends Adult Immunizations
October 3, 1997: County Health Department Extends Clinic Hours for IG
September 12, 1997: Funding Continues for Abstinence By Choice Program
August 27, 1997: Bats May Spread Rabies, Health Officials Caution
August 25, 1997: County Health Department Offers Free Back-to-School Immunizations
August 13, 1997: County Health Authorities Report Rabid Kitten
July 28, 1997: Hot Weather Health Update
July 25, 1997: Hot Weather Health Advisory
July 1, 1997: $500,000 in Funding Available for Recycling Projects
June 24, 1997: Hot Weather Health Advisory
June 9, 1997: County Health Department provides daily pollen counts, offers free brochure
May 22, 1997: World No-Tobacco Day
May 7, 1997: County Recycling Materials Now Available Upon Request
April 18, 1997: 90% Immunization Goal Achieved in St. Louis County
April 15, 1997: Waste Reduction Program in County Schools
April 1, 1997: Public Health Week Proclaimed April 7 - 13
March 7, 1997: Rabies Vaccinations for Veterinarians
February 24, 1997: Public Health, Police Pair Up
Januray 30, 1997: St. Louis County Recycling “How-To” Guides Now Available


St. Louis County Department of Health Offers Car Seat Safety Check


(October 28, 1997) – County residents can get a safety check for child car seats at St. Louis County Health Centers, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. on the following dates:


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Wednesday November 5 at Pine Lawn Health Center, 6150 Natural Bridge;

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Thursday November 6 at John C. Murphy Health Center, 6065 Helen Avenue in Berkeley;

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and Wednesday November 12 at South County Health Center, 4580, South Lindbergh.


No appointment is needed. Focus of the safety check is to identify unsafe or recalled car seats, and to educate people on the correct use of the safety seat. Refreshments will be provided courtesy of McDonalds restaurants.


According to health director Paula Livingston-Thomas, “We are delighted to be able to offer this valuable service to County residents.” Dr. Thomas adds, “We join the Safety Council of Greater St. Louis and Operation Safe Kids, along with a number of other community groups, in promoting safety in car seats.”



Department of Health Recommends Adult Immunizations


(October 8, 1997) – This fall, as we remember the importance of flu shots, we shouldn't forget about some other vital shots we may need. Adult Immunization Week is observed October 12-18 to remind us of the importance of being vaccinated against measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, diphtheria and chickenpox.


According to Dr. Paula Livingston-Thomas, Director of St. Louis County Department of Health, “Each year in the United States, as many as 70,000 adults die needlessly from vaccine-preventable diseases or their complications. In public health, we are committed to prevention, and that's why we are urging everyone to make sure all their adult immunizations are upto date.”


About half of all Americans over the age of 50 are not immunized against tetanus and diphtheria. Forty to 60 cases of tetanus still occur each year, resulting in at least 10 deaths annually in the United States. One out of every 10 people with diphtheria will die from it. As many as 12,000,000 women of childbearing age are susceptible to rubella. If rubella occurs during pregnancy, it can result in sever birth defects, miscarriages and stillbirths.


Measles can afflict people of any age, but those born after 1956 are particularly at risk. Death rarely results from mumps, but adults are at greater risk than children of dying from the disease. Adults are 25 times more likely to die from chickenpox than children, and 10 times more likely to require hospitalization or develop pneumonia, bacterial infections and brain inflammation (encephalitis). Vaccinations are also available for adults at risk of hepatitis A, hepatitis B and pneumonia. For more information about adult immunizations, call St. Louis County Department of Health, Communicable Diseases Control, at 854-6630, or consult your health care provider.


Visit our CDCC page for more information about communicable disease control.


Check our Web of Prevention page for links to the National CDC Center.



County Health Department Extends Clinic Hours for IG


(October 3, 1997) – St. Louis County Department of Health is extending clinic hours to offer Immune globulin (IG) shots to County residents who were exposed to hepatitis A through an infected food worker at Shoney's Restaurant located on Highway 54 in Osage Beach at the Lake of the Ozarks.


Individuals who consumed iced drinks, desserts or ice cream at the restaurant between 4 p.m. and 4 a.m. on September 19, 20, or 21 may obtain the shots free of charge at the South County Health Center, 4580 South Lindbergh (Lindbergh just south of Gravois) until 6:30 pm. tonight.



Funding Continues for Abstinence By Choice Program


(September 12, 1997) – The St. Louis Teen Pregnancy Collaborative, a group of seven local foundations and corporate giving programs, is providing $58,258 in funding for the Abstinence By Choice (ABC) program conducted by St. Louis County Department of Health.


“The ABC program is a comprehensive approach to preventing teen pregnancy and other negative outcomes of early sexual involvement,” said Dr. Paula Livingston-Thomas, Director, St. Louis County Department of Health.


Beginning in elementary schools, a professional team presents a “Family Life” unit over a four-week period, including parent/child worksheets to facilitate family disucssions in the home. In middle school, a five-week series is delivered by high school teen leaders who are trained to reinforce the message of abstinence. Through interactive exercises and skill building sessions, students gain the ability to resist pressure to become sexually active.


Community and parental involvement are important components of the program. During the school year, parents, religious leaders, business owners and other concerned community members may participate in the effort to prevent teen pregnancy by attending ABC workshops.


The St. Louis Teen Collaborative is an interest group of the Metropolitan Association of Philanthropy. Donor members of the Collaborative are: the Danforth Foundation, the Kellwood Foundation, the William T. Kemper Foundation, Monsanto Fund, Ralston Purina Company, the Roblee Foundation and the Sunnen Foundation. Abstinence by Choice is the only program to be funded by the Collaborative this year.


The ABC program was piloted in the middle school of the Normandy School District during the 1995-1996 school year, expanding to the Jennings School District in 1996-1997. Plans for 1997-1998 include continuation of current programming and the addition of the Wellston School District.



Bats May Spread Rabies, Health Officials Caution


(August 27, 1997) – The Animal Control office at St. Louis County Department of Health is receiving an increased number of calls from residents concerned about bats carrying rabies, says Dan Knox, D.V.M., Manager of Animal Control. Two recent deaths (in Montana and Washington state) were attributed to rabies contracted from bats. The virus is spread through the animal's saliva.


“We tell people that they should be concerned about any incident in which a bat is found inside a home where someone is sleeping, because exposure could occur during sleep without the person knowing it,” Dr. Knox says. “Bats have small teeth and bite marks may not be readily apparent. We also have to be especially vigilant about households with infants and small children, or anyone with a limited awareness of their own surroundings or an inability to communicate.”


“Even contact that seems insignificant could result in a possible exposure,” said Mike Williams, Ph.D., Managaer of Communicable Disease Control, “so we would rather err on the side of caution where bats are concerned. New guidelines from the federal Centers for Disease Control advise treatment with post exposure rabies prophylaxis in all situations where contact probably occurred, even if there is no visible bite wound found on the person.”


People should secure their homes to prevent bats from getting into attics or crawl spaces. Bats can enter through extremely small openings. If you see a bat, don't touch it or pick it up. A sick bat may lose its ability to fly and may fall to the ground. If you can safely do so, carefully place a box or container over it, and call animal control authorities so they can test the bat for rabies.


St. Louis County Department of Health Director Dr. Paula Livingston-Thomas explains, “Since rabies can be readily passed from wild animals to domestic pets, vaccination is our first line of defense against this fatal disease.” She urges pet owners to make sure cats and dogs are properly vaccinated, adding that, “Once transmitted, the disease of rabies has no cure.” For more information or assistance, County residents may call Animal Control at 726-6655 (south) or 831-6500 (north).


Visit our CDCC page for more information about communicable disease control.


Check our Web of Prevention page for links to the National CDC Center.



County Health Department Offers Free Back-to-School Immunizations


(August 25, 1997) – Before heading back to the classroom, kids need to be updated on their immunizations. St. Louis County Department of Health (DOH) provides free childhood immunizations to County residents at all DOH Health Centers. No appointment is needed. Locations and times (effective September 1) are:


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John C. Murphy Health Center, 6065 Helen Ave., Berkeley, 522-6410, Monday and Wednesday 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday noon to 7 p.m., Thursday and Friday 8:30 a.m. to noon.

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Pine Lawn Health Center, 6150 Natural Bridge Road, Pine Lawn, 389-4700, Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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South County Health Center, 4580 South Lindbergh Blvd., Sunset Hills, 842-1300, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday 12:30 to 7:30 p.m.


“We are proud that 94% of the children seen in our St. Louis County Health Centers are current on all their vaccinations, up from 90% last year,” said Dr. Paula Livingston-Thomas, Director of St. Louis County Department of Health.


Free immunizations are also available at the St. Louis County WIC (Women, Infants & Children) sites:


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Dunn WIC site, 1815 Dunn Road, Waterford Plaza, Florissant, Monday and Tuesday, 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.

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Valley Park WIC site, 112 St. Louis Avenue, Valley Park, 1st and 3rd Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.

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Pine Lawn WIC site, 6150 Natural Bridge Road, 2nd and 4th Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.

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Vorhof WIC/Head Start site, 10725 Vorhof Drive, Friday 9 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.


For more information, call St. Louis County Department of Health at 854-6630.



County Health Authorities Report Rabid Kitten


(August 13, 1997) – A stray kitten rescued from the side of the road in rural Missouri and brought home with a west County family has tested positive for rabies. Family members and friends who had contact with the animal are now undergoing post exposure rabies vaccination, according to St. Louis County Departmetn of Health.


The kitten became ill two weeks after the family took it in. It was taken to a veterinary clinic on Friday, where it was euthanized. St. Louis County Animal Control received positive rabies test results late Tuesday.


“This is the first confirmed case of rabies in a domestic pet in St. Louis County since 1981,” said Dan Knox, D.V.M., manager of Animal Control. He notes there is always a risk when people rescue stray or wild animals, even though the urge to do so is well intentioned.


“If someone is bitten by an animal, they should wash the bite thoroughly, seek medical attention and report the bite to Animal Control,” said Dr. Knox. Close contact with wild animals, such as bats, should be evaluated.


This is a reminder of the importance of vaccinating pets, for their own protection, and as a barrier between wildlife rabies and humans.


Find out more about our County Shelter and Animal Control services. Visit our CDCC page for more information about communicable disease control.


Check our Web of Prevention page for links to the National CDC Center.



Hot Weather Health Update


(July 28, 1997) – The Hot Weather Health Warning issued Saturday has been downgraded to a Hot Weather Health Advisory by health officials in the City of St. Louis and St. Louis County. the National Weather Service has canceled the Excessive Heat Warning for the City of St. Louis, issued Saturday, and the Heat Advisory for the entire metropolitan St. Louis area, issued last Friday, because of lower temperatures predicted for today.


Even though temperatures and heat indices have returned to more normal summer levels, the Hot Weather Health Advisory will stay in effect for today, to remind everyone that dwellings may still be hot.


A survey of area hospitals revealed that over the weekend 14 individuals were treated and released for heat illness, with two hospital admissions, in the City of St. Louis. For St. Louis County, there were three individuals admitted and 19 treated and released for heat illness. This information is for the previous 48 hours.


Everyone in the Metropolitan St. Louis area, especially the elderly and others at high risk for heat illness, should continue to take precautions to protect their health. All citizens and visitors to St. Louis are adivsed to follow the Department of Health and Hospitals' Hot Weather Tips until the predicted cooler temperatures arrive.


Check at least daily on elderly neighbors and relatives. High risk individuals should spend at least the hottest part of the day in air conditioned quarters. Individuals working in the heat are advised to drink plenty of non-alcoholic beverages and take frequent breaks in the shade.


Pets are also affected by extreme heat. Please make sure that outdoor pets have access to shade and fresh water at all times, and do not leave pets in closed vehicles.


For help with a serious heat illness, call 911. For information about services of Operation Weather Service member agencies that help individuals survive the heat, call the Operation Weather Survival Hotline at the Human Development Corporation at 535-7607.


Find out more about heat-related illnesses, prevention and treatment.



Hot Weather Health Advisory


(July 25, 1997) – A Hot Weather Health Advisory has been issued this morning by health officials in the City of St. Louis and St. Louis County. The National Weather Service has issued a Heat Advisory for the entire State of Missouri. This Advisory warns residents of the community that heat indices today and throughout the weekend are predicted to be extremely high and can be dangerous to health, especially for high risk individuals.


We can expect temperatures and the heat index to be dangerously high today and for the foreseeable future. This Hot Weather Health Advisory will remain in effect until temperatures moderate. The Air Quality Forecast from the American Lung Association and the Clean Air Partnership also predicts a RED Air Quality Day, for unhealthful ground level ozone, for today. This increases the danger of heat illness for high risk individuals.


Everyone in the Metropolitan St. Louis area, especially the elderly and others at high risk for heat illness, should take precautions to protect their health. All citizens and visitors to St. Louis are advised to follow the Department of Health and Hospitals' Hot Weather Tips for as long as the dangerous heat persists.


Check at least daily on elderly neighbors and relatives. High risk individuals should spend at least the hottest part of the day in air conditioned quarters. Individuals working in the heat are advised to drink plenty of non-alcoholic beverages and take frequent breaks in the shade.


Pets are also affected by extreme heat. Please make sure that outdoor pets have access to shade and fresh water at all times, and do not leave pets in closed vehicles.


For help with a serious heat illness, call 911. For information about services of Operation Weather Service member agencies that help individuals survive the heat, call the Operation Weather Survival Hotline at the Human Development Corporation at 535-7607.


Find out more about heat-related illnesses, prevention and treatment.



$500,000 in Funding Available for Recycling Projects


(July 1, 1997) – St. Louis County Department of Health (DOH) announces $500,000 in funding is now available through its Recycling and Source Reduction Grant Program for municipalities and unincorporated areas.


“The primary goal is to enhance residential recycling programs and decrease the amount of waste deposited in landfills,” said Paula Livingston-Thomas, DDS, MPH, DOH Director.


Equipment, public education, and certain related costs for recycling programs are eligible for funding. Projects must occur in St. Louis County. Municipal governments and organizations involved in recycling activities for unincorporated areas may apply. Cooperative efforts are encouraged, Dr. Thomas said.


Main objectives of the program are to increase convenience, cost-effectiveness and self-sufficiency of recycling efforts in St. Louis County. Source of the funding is a 5% surcharge on waste deposited in St. Louis County landfills. Twenty-six grants were awarded from the same funding source in previous years.


Deadline for submitting applications is September 19, 1997. Grants are awarded on a competitive basis. For more information or to request an application, please contact the St. Louis County Department of Health, Office of the Solid Waste Coordinator, 111 South Meramec, Clayton, MO, 63105; phone 854-6958 (854-6446 TDD).


The St. Louis area has increased its capacity for processing recycled materials in the past year, bringing more opportunities for recycling collection efforts in St. Louis County.


Visit the web page of the Office of the Solid Waste Coordinator

View or download the most recent County Recycling Directory



Hot Weather Health Advisory


(June 24, 1997) – Health officials in the city of St. Louis and St. Louis County are issuing a Hot Weather Health Advisory today to remind the community that hot weather is a danger to health. The National Weather Service, this morning, issued a Heat Advisory for the City. This Advisory warns residents of the City and the surrounding densely urbanized areas of the County and Metro-East, that expected heat indices can be dangerous to health, especially for high risk individuals.


We can expect temperatures to be above normal today and tomorrow. This Hot Weather Health Advisory will remain in effect until temperatures moderate.


Everyone in the Metropolitan St. Louis area, especially the elderly and others at high risk for heat illness, should take precautions to protect their health these first few hot days because they are not acclimated to the heat. It takes several days of hot weather for a body to adjust to the change in temperature.


Check at least daily on elderly neighbors and relatives. High risk individuals should spend at least the hottest part of the day in air conditioned quarters. Individuals working in the heat are advised to drink plenty of non-alcoholic beverages and take frequent breaks in the shade.


For information about services of Operation Weather Service member agencies that help individuals survive the heat, call the Operation Weather Service Hotline at the Human Development Corporation at 535-7607.


Find out more about heat-related illnesses, prevention and treatment.



Daily Pollen Counts – Free Brochure


(June 9, 1997) – Today and every day, airborne pollen levels are carefully measured and recorded by technicians in the Environmental Health Laboratories at St. Louis County Department of Health. The daily pollen count is given to meteorologists, allergists, health organizations and others, It’s also available by calling St. Louis County Department of Health’s “pollen hotline” at 854-6825.


Many people are susceptible to aeroallergens such as tree or grass pollens, ragweed and mold. Tracking the daily pollen counts can help you identify (and avoid exposure to) the particular allergen which is causing problems. To minimize exposure, avoid outdoor activities like jogging or lawn chores, especially early in the morning. St. Louis County Department of Health has an informational brochure on aeroallergens. To request a free copy, please call 854-6324.


Environmental Health Laboratories are located at the St. Louis County Department of Health in Clayton. Call to set up a time to come in and tour the lab.


Visit the Environmental Services home page of the Department of Health.

Find out more about pollen counts.



World No-Tobacco Day


(May 22, 1997) – Following this year's theme of “United for a tobacco-free world,” St. Louis County Department of Health joins health professionals around the world in observing World No-Tobacco Day on May 31.


“We want to take this opportunity to remind people that tobacco use is a primary cause of cancer, including cancer of the lung, bladder, mouth, cervix, larynx, esophagus, pancreas and stomach,” said Dr. Paula Livingston-Thomas, director.


Smoking is also a cause of heart disease, lung diseases, stroke, and low birthweight babies. It may contribute to peptic ulcers, inability to conceive, increased infant mortality and sudden infant death syndrome.


“The Department of Health is dedicated to education and prevention,” Dr. Thomas stated. “Tobacco use has a devastating effect on personal and public health. We would like to invite tobacco users to stop, and persuade non users to never begin using tobacco. We are especially concerned about young people, as they are the most vulnerable population being targeted now by the tobacco companies.”


Dr. Thomas adds there are programs in place to help smokers who want to kick the habit. County residents can call 727-0565 for a recorded message.



County Recycling Materials Now Available Upon Request


(May 7, 1997) – “Earth Day is every day” and St. Louis County Department of Health's Office of the Solid Waste Coordinator, as part of its "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle...Naturally!" public education campaign is helping residents with tips from its new recycling brochure series and other exciting education materials.


The brochures and educational materials were produced after a public opinion survey conducted in St. Louis County showed that residents want to learn how to recycle more items. The overall goal of the campaign, which is supported by St. Louis County landfill surcharge funds, is to reduce the amount of trash going into local landfills.


The brochure series, available to residents free of charge, includes four colorful, educational pamphlets designed to help the "beginning" recycler get started, and answer some common questions for "practicing" recyclers.


The series, which is perfect for all age groups, includes:


1. Should I Recycle?...Naturally!, which concerns general recycling;
2. Home Is Where The Hazardous Waste Is, which helps recyclers identify and properly handle household hazardous waste;
3. Practice Source Reduction... Naturally!, which helps consumers purchase products that generate less packaging waste and provides suggestions on reuse of items otherwise discarded; and
4. Yard Waste Management...Naturally!, which answers common yard waste management questions. If you or your organization would like to receive the brochures or other helpful educational materials, including recycling activity kits, or information on recycling for the classroom,home or office, please call the St. Louis County Recycling Hotline at 286-9200.

Visit the web page of the Office of the Solid Waste Coordinator

View or download the most recent County Recycling Directory



90% Immunization Goal Achieved in St. Louis County


(April 18, 1997) – St. Louis County reports today that 90.1% of County children born in 1994 are up to date with their childhood immunizations. The news comes as St. Louis County Executive Buzz Westfall proclaims the week of April 20-26 as “Infant Immunization Week” in St. Louis County, encouraging parents and health providers to make sure children have all their required immunizations on time.


“We are proud to see this steady improvement,” said Dr. aula Livingston-Thomas, Director of St. Louis County Department of Health (DOH). “As a result of our efforts, we have seen the percentage of children who are appropriately immunized rise from 33% in 1994 to 61% in 1995, and to 90% now. St. Louis County has achieved, ahead of schedule, the governor's goal of 90% by September 1997.”


St. Louis County DOH offers childhood immunizations free of charge at DOH health centers and WIC (Women Infants & Children) sites. For information on free childhood vaccinations for County residents, call the St. Louis County Department of Health, Communicable Disease Control office at 854-6630.


By the age of two, a baby should have received the following immunizations:


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Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis

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Measles, Mumps, Rubella

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Hepatitis B

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Polio

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Haemophilus influenzae type b


Although many children are immunized when they enter kindergarten, getting shots later than age two exposes thousands of children to potentially life threatening illnesses. Nationwide, many children are stricken each year with diseases previously thought to be wiped out, such as whooping cough.


Visit our CDCC page for more information about communicable disease control.
Check our Web of Prevention page for links to the National CDC Center.


Waste Reduction Program in County Schools
Comprehensive School District Waste Reduction Program Launched in St. Louis County


(April 15, 1997) – As part of its “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle…Naturally!” public education campaign, the St. Louis County Department of Health (DOH) will join forces with the Cooperating School Districts of Greater St. Louis (CSD) to bring comprehensive waste management programs and innovative recycling education to County school districts.


DOH and CSD will provide assistance to school district officials to help them pursue comprehensive, cost-effective and efficient waste management programs that include recycling, source reduction and responsible procurement. This partnership will also train teachers to incorporate recycling education into their classroom activities to students will understand the many issues related to waste management.


“A recent survey indicates that nine out of ten St. Louis County residents would like more information on recycling,” according to Dr. Paula Livingston-Thomas, Director, DOH. “We are pleased to be working with the Cooperating School Districts because they are so well positioned to lead such an educational initiative.”


CDS encompasses many specialties to address all aspects of a school district's waste reduction program, including the ability to:


  1. Review current purchasing policies and waste hauling contracts;
  2. Develop and update curriculum;
  3. Develop and distribute video communications about the project's process and progress; and
  4. Utilize its expertise in student-centered, project-based learning about waste reduction and recycling.

Bayless, Mehlville and Riverview Garden School Districts are participating in this pilot program, which will continue through the '97 - '98 school year. The CSD team will work closely with superintendents, facility managers, principals, teachers and students to implement a comprehensive waste reduction program that meets each district's needs.


The program will be funded by $200,000 from County landfill surcharges and is part of a broader program to cut the volume of waste disposed of in landfills in St. Louis County by forty percent (40%) by 1998.


Visit the web page of the Office of the Solid Waste Coordinator
View or download the most recent County Recycling Directory


Public Health Week Proclaimed April 7 - 13


(April 1, 1997) – St. Louis County Executive Buzz Westfall recognizes today the importance of public health in our community and in our everyday lives.


“Public health ensures that our water is clean, that our food supply is safe, and that infectious diseases are kept under control,” Westfall said. In honor of national Public Health Week, Westfall proclaims April 7 - 13 as Public Health Week in St. Louis County.


“Whether we’re aware of it or not, public health activities have an impact on us every day,” Westfall said, citing examples such as childhood immunizations, restaurant inspection, birth and death certificates, daily pollen and mold counts, environmental monitoring and enforcement activities.


Dr. Paula Livingston-Thomas, director of St. Louis County Department of Health, adds, “Our public health system, with its focus on prevention, continues to be our first line of defense against disease, and it’s our foundation for future gains in the length and quality of life.”


Celebrate Public Health Week (April 7 - 13) with Longer Life


At the turn of the century, the average life expectancy of Americans was about 45 years. Today the average life span has increased to 75 years. While curative medicine is credited with five of those years, public health prevention measures are responsible for the vast majority of the gain - 25 extra years of living.


(Source: American Public Health Association, Feb. 1996)


Public Health

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Prevents epidemics and the spread of disease

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Protects against environmental hazards

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Promotes healthy behaviors

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Responds to disasters and assists in recovery

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Provides environmental surveillance

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Records vital statistics

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Assures quality of services


Check out ninety years of public health history in St. Louis County.



Rabies Vaccinations for Veterinarians


(March 7, 1997) – Veterinarians lined up for rabies vaccinations at the Henry VIII Lodge on North Lindbergh on Friday, March 7, 1997 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.


Veterinarians and their staff routinely give our pets protection against rabies, which is always present in the wild animal community. Their occupational hazard is that they are constantly exposed to potentially rabid animals. So the vets need protection, too! That protection is available through routine pre-exposure rabies booster shots.


St. Louis County Department of Health (DOH) in conjunction with the Greater St. Louis Veterinary Medical Association, provided the service for the metropolitan area. About 175 people were expected to attend.


Find out more about our County Shelter and Animal Control services.


Public Health, Police Pair Up


(February 24, 1997) – A 911 call comes in. Police, EMS and Fire Department are dispatched. But it turns out that all that‘s needed is a strong hand to turn off a water faucet that is overflowing because the 85 year old resident with arthritis is unable to turn it off.


The police officer asks if the resident would like to be contacted by the “911 nurse”, and the case is referred to the St. Louis County Department of Health (DOH). A DOH home health nurse calls, visits, assesses the situation and suggests intervention, screenings, or other assistance. The DOH public health nurse in-home care continues to check on the family and help out as long as necessary.


It sounds simple and logical, but in fact this is the first effort of its kind in the nation. And it saves taxpayers’ money because many future 911 calls, at a cost of hundreds of dollars per call, will never need to be made.


According to Dr. Paula Livingston-Thomas, Director, St Louis County DOH, “I’m delighted to be involved in this partnership with Chief of Police Ron Battelle. We welcome the opportunity to serve those individuals in our community who can benefit from our programs, and we’re happy that our efforts are not only cost effective, but also help the first line responders to 911 calls in meeting the challenges they face every day.”



St. Louis County Recycling “How-To” Guides Now Available


(January 30, 1997) – “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle…Naturally!” with tips from the St. Louis County Recycling “How-To” Guide, is now available through St. Louis County Department of Health’s Office of the Solid Waste Coordinator.


A recent survey conducted in St. Louis County showed that residents want to learn how to recycle more items (in addition to those they are already recycling). The “How-To” Guide was created specifically for this purpose as part of the St. Louis County Department of Health’s “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle...Naturally!” public education campaign. The goal of the campaign is to reduce the amount of trash going into County landfill space 40 percent by 1998.


The guide, available to St. Louis County residents free of charge, is divided into specific areas of interest and offers advice on how to get the most out of recycling at home, in your garage and yard, in your office, and even at school. The handy guide also provides answers to many recycling questions and will help readers recycle more.


If you would like a copy of The St. Louis County Recycling “How-To” Guide, or other helpful recycling information for your home or office, call the new St. Louis County Recycling Hotline at 286-9200. Special interest committees or organizations may request multiple copies of the guide by contacting the St. Louis County Office of the Solid Waste Coordinator at 854-6958.


The St. Louis County “How-To” Recycling Guide was made possible by the St. Louis County Department of Health “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle ... Naturally!” public education campaign funded by the County landfill surcharges.


Visit the web page of the Office of the Solid Waste Coordinator

View or download the most recent County Recycling Directory